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Success! Sophea from Cambodia raised $925 to fund surgery so she can hear and communicate.

Sophea
100%
  • $925 raised, $0 to go
$925
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Sophea's treatment was fully funded on July 3, 2022.

Photo of Sophea post-operation

July 11, 2022

Sophea underwent surgery so she can hear and communicate.

The surgeons at our medical partner CSC implanted a hearing aid behind Sophea’s ear. Sophea suffered from hearing loss most of her life and now hopes to have the chance to have a good life. She looks forward to improved hearing and fewer infections. This will help her to excel in school and communicate much better with others.

Sophea said: “I am happy I will be able to hear well and not be ashamed because I don’t understand. I can be healthier and not have so many infections. Thank you to the staff at CSC who explained everything to me and to the donors who helped support my surgery.”

The surgeons at our medical partner CSC implanted a hearing aid behind Sophea's ear. Sophea suffered from hearing loss most of her life and ...

Read more
March 8, 2022

Sophea is a 16-year-old student in grade ten. Sophea has three siblings, and she is the youngest. All three siblings currently study at the secondary school near their home. Her parents have been divorced since she was two years old, so she lives with her mother, who is a construction worker. When she is not studying, she likes to read and spend time with her school friends.

Since she can remember, Sophea has had ear infections which have caused a cholesteatoma, or an abnormal skin growth, to develop in the middle ear behind the ear drum. Sophea experiences hearing loss, discharge, and fevers. Doctors has diagnosed an ear condition called microtia, which means she is missing the ear canal. Her mother has taken her to different healers for treatment but it has not improved. It is difficult for her to hear at school, she does not communicate well with friends and family, and often misses school due to infections. This makes her feel shy with strangers.

Sophea traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On March 8th, she will undergo a mastoidectomy procedure in her left ear. During this procedure, ENT surgeons will remove the cholesteatoma. Our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, is requesting $925 to fund this procedure. This covers medications, supplies, and inpatient care.

She is hopeful that her hearing will improve and she won’t have any more infections!

Sophea is a 16-year-old student in grade ten. Sophea has three siblings, and she is the youngest. All three siblings currently study at the ...

Read more

Sophea's Timeline

  • March 8, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Sophea was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • March 8, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Sophea received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 10, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Sophea's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 3, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Sophea's treatment was fully funded.

  • July 11, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Sophea's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 23 donors

Funded by 23 donors

Treatment
Mastoidectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $925 for Sophea's treatment
Hospital Fees
$153
Medical Staff
$771
Medication
$1
Supplies
$0
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A mastoidectomy is a surgical procedure that removes diseased mastoid air cells. A patient who needs a mastoidectomy will experience hearing loss, chronic ear infections, and possibly cholesteatoma—an abnormal skin growth in the middle ear. Cholesteatomas cause hearing loss and ear discharge. The cholesteatoma will erode bones in the middle ear and can eventually expose the brain and cause death in complicated, untreated cases.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients live with hearing loss and chronic ear infections.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Treated incorrectly or left untreated, an infected mastoid bone can cause hearing loss, persistent ear discharge, meningitis, temporary dizziness, and temporary loss of taste. Due to poor hygiene and limited education in rural Cambodia, patients are likely to experience complications and receive the incorrect treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

A mastoidectomy is performed with the patient asleep under general anesthesia. Surgeons will perform one of several different types of mastoidectomy, depending on the amount of infection present. These include: • Simple (or closed) mastoidectomy: The operation is performed through the ear or through an incision behind the ear. The surgeon opens the mastoid bone and removes the infected air cells. The eardrum is incised to drain the middle ear. Topical antibiotics are placed in the ear. • Radical mastoidectomy: This procedure removes the most bone and is usually performed for extensive spread of a cholesteatoma. The eardrum and middle ear structures may be completely removed. Usually the stapes, the "stirrup"-shaped bone, is spared to preserve some hearing. • Modified radical mastoidectomy: In this procedure, some middle ear bones are left in place, and the eardrum is rebuilt by tympanoplasty. After surgery, the wound is stitched up around a drainage tube, and a dressing is applied.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment will relieve chronic ear infections, hearing loss, and other symptoms caused by the infected mastoid bone.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This treatment is highly effective, but it poses risks if performed by an inexperienced surgeon. The operation is near the facial nerve and the brain, so surgeons must be careful when operating. At Children's Surgical Centre, ENT surgeons only operate on cases about which they feel confident.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care for this condition is not easily accessible in Phnom Penh. Only one other hospital performs ENT surgery, but care at that hospital is expensive. The ENT surgeons at our medical partner have a proven record of successful cases.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Once the infection stops responding to antibiotics, surgery is the only option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Ronald

Ronald is a middle-aged farmer from Kenya who is the thirdborn in a family of six. He and his family all live in semi-permanent houses and work as small-scale farmers. His father passed away years ago, so his mother, who is diabetic, was left to care for the children alone. Ronald studied up to the college level, but he could not secure a job in his field, so he now works as a casual laborer. He also helps his mother with house chores since she is sick and on medication, making it difficult for her to do them alone. With the income he earns through doing casual labor, Ronald helps support his family's basic day-to-day needs. Ronald was recently involved in a road traffic accident while traveling as a passenger on a motorbike. After his driver lost control due to being hit by another motorbike, they both fell on the tarmacked road, and the motorbike landed on Ronald's lower limbs. Fortunately, there were people around who helped them, but he could not manage to stand. He had to be lifted onto a passenger service vehicle, which took him to the hospital. Since he sustained an open fracture to his foot during the accident, it was treated as an emergency, and he was immediately taken to the operating room for cleaning and debridement. He was then admitted to the ward and is now waiting to undergo fracture repair surgery. He is currently in pain and unable to use his limb Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On August 12th, Ronald will undergo a fracture repair procedure called an open reduction and internal fixation. After the procedure, he will no longer be in pain and will be able to walk and work again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Ronald says, "I earn a living through casual jobs, which some are near and some are far from home. This state has actually brought me down. Please help me so that I may not be a burden once I am able to work.”

76% funded

76%funded
$872raised
$273to go
Shwe

Shwe is a 24-year-old woman who lives with her family in Burma and enjoys listening to Burmese pop music! Shwe previously worked in a factory, but she had to stop working last December when her health began to deteriorate. Her brother and stepfather both work as agricultural day laborers, and her sister-in-law and mother are both homemakers. The rest of her siblings are all waiting for schools to reopen so they can return to their studies. The schools were closed in February of 2021 following the Mayanmar military coup. About a year and a half ago, Shwe began to experience pain in her chest, as well as fatigue. She initially did not think that her symptoms were serious, but this changed after she fainted at work a few months later. After receiving an echocardiogram, she was diagnosed with mitral valve, aortic valve, and tricuspid valve regurgitation, which are all cardiac conditions that occur when the specified valve does not close properly. As a result, she experiences difficulty breathing, a rapid heartbeat, a lack of appetite, and trouble sleeping. She also feels very tired when walking longer distances. Shwe now needs cardiac surgery to help alleviate her symptoms and allow her to live more comfortably and confidently. However, once the doctor told her and her family the cost of surgery, they left the hospital because they could not pay for Shwe's needed procedure. Fortunately, they happened to meet a taxi driver who kindly told them about our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). BCMF is now helping Shwe undergo cardiac surgery on August 12th at Pun Hlaing Hospital. Shwe and her family need your support to fund this $1,500 procedure. Shwe says, “When I recover fully, I will go back to work and work hard. I will save my money and support my family.”

63% funded

63%funded
$958raised
$542to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.