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Lay is a cookie seller from Cambodia who needs $216 to fund eye surgery.

Lay
30%
  • $65 raised, $151 to go
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$151
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May 13, 2021

Lay is a 42-year-old cookie seller at a local school. She has one son and her husband passed away of lung cancer two years ago. The school Lay normally sells cookies at is closed during the COVID lockdown, so she is staying at home right now. She shared that she enjoys planting flowers and gardening.

Four years ago, Lay developed a pterygium in her right eye, causing her tearing and irritation. Pterygiums are non-cancerous growths of the conjunctiva, a mucous layer that lubricates the eye. The growths occur when the conjunctiva is exposed to excessive sun damage and the cells grow abnormally over the pupil. She has difficulty seeing things clearly, recognizing faces, working, and going anywhere outside.

When Lay learned about our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, she traveled there with her sister seeking treatment. Lay needs a surgical procedure to remove the abnormal conjunctiva from the cornea surface and replace it with a conjunctival graft to prevent recurrence. The total cost of her procedure is $216. This covers medications, supplies, and inpatient care for two days. The procedure is scheduled for May 13th.

Lay said, “I hope after surgery I feel comfortable and my eye looks better. Then I can look forward to selling sweets again when the school opens.”

Lay is a 42-year-old cookie seller at a local school. She has one son and her husband passed away of lung cancer two years ago. The school L...

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Lay's Timeline

  • May 13, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Lay was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • May 13, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Lay received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 14, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Lay's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 24, 2021
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Lay's treatment update from Children's Surgical Centre.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Lay is currently raising funds for her treatment.

Funded by 4 donors

Funded by 4 donors

Treatment
Pterygium
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $216 for Lay's treatment
Hospital Fees
$47
Medical Staff
$129
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A pterygium, a non-cancerous growth of conjunctiva covering the cornea, causes tearing, redness, blurred vision, burning, itchiness, and discomfort.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

When the growth affects the central visual axis, vision will be decreased. The abnormal growth also causes pain and discomfort. Patients usually complain of irritation, light sensitivity, foreign body sensation, and decreased vision.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Pterygium occurrence is much higher among people who live near the equator because of greater exposure to the sun. It is nicknamed "surfer's eye."

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgeons scrape the dysplastic conjunctiva from the cornea surface, removing the affected conjunctiva. They place an autologous conjunctival graft to cover the defect and prevent recurrence.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Surgery cures the symptoms caused by pterygium. Patients experience improved vision and reduced pain and discomfort.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Surgical excision of a pterygium is curative. The procedure is very low risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Most patients live with the eye irritation and decreased vision until it starts to affect their daily life. Then, they seek care.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Irritation can be temporarily treated with lubricating drops.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Yin

Yin is a 62-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, son in-law, and granddaughter in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. She is a homemaker, and she loves cooking and cleaning around her house. In her free time, Yin loves to play with her granddaughter. Her husband is retried, and her son in-law is unemployed. Yin’s family receives 800 baht (approx. 27 USD) on a cash card every month to purchase rations. This income is just enough for their daily needs, but they cannot afford to pay other costs like healthcare. Currently, Yin has limited vision and can only make out if it is dark or light outside with her right eye. The vision in Yin’s left eye is starting to blur, and she cannot see far with her left eye. She is worried that she will lose vision in both of her eyes. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Yin. On June 8th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Yin's natural lenses and replace them with an intraocular lens implant in each eye. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Yin shared, "Before my vision started to blur, I used to make and sell mohinga [a type of Burmese noodles]. With the money that I earned from selling mohinga, I was able to buy vegetables for my family. However, when the vision in my right eye vision became blurred, I could no longer make mohinga anymore. I hope that my vision will be restored after I complete my treatment.”

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$1,470raised
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James

James is former motorbike taxi driver from Kenya. He's married and is the father of two children 13 and 6 years old. James' wife is works part-time on a rice farm in their hometown. The family currently lives in a rental house paid for by their local church pastor. In November 2017, James was in a motorbike accident. Due to the accident, he lost his job, and he shared that his life became one revolving around experiencing pain and constant hospital visits. He underwent surgery on his broken leg in a nearby health facility in his hometown. Following the procedure he had a challenging recovery due to infections, causing him sleepless nights and visits to different healthcare facilities. James was finally referred to our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital where he underwent several treatments in May. James returned home but later came back to the hospital with a wounded leg that was in bad shape with an exposed bone. The doctors originally admitted James for repair surgery, but determined he needed a below-knee amputation which took place in mid-June. James still experiences a lot of pain, so the surgeon recommend he undergo another round of intense debridement in the amputated area to remove his damaged tissue and help him to finally heal. James has national health insurance, which supported his two major surgeries, but his coverage has been depleted and will not support the care he needs now. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping James receive treatment. On June 25th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to prevent the spread of infection and speed up his recovery. Now, James needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. James wishes to be free from pain, “I, unfortunately, lost my leg due to a sudden amputation, and I am still in shock. I will never be able to use both legs again. I am still in a lot of pain and the wound needs another procedure for me to be well. I need to get out of the hospital and figure out how to take care of my family with my current condition.”

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Yin

Yin is a 62-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, son in-law, and granddaughter in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. She is a homemaker, and she loves cooking and cleaning around her house. In her free time, Yin loves to play with her granddaughter. Her husband is retried, and her son in-law is unemployed. Yin’s family receives 800 baht (approx. 27 USD) on a cash card every month to purchase rations. This income is just enough for their daily needs, but they cannot afford to pay other costs like healthcare. Currently, Yin has limited vision and can only make out if it is dark or light outside with her right eye. The vision in Yin’s left eye is starting to blur, and she cannot see far with her left eye. She is worried that she will lose vision in both of her eyes. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Yin. On June 8th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Yin's natural lenses and replace them with an intraocular lens implant in each eye. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Yin shared, "Before my vision started to blur, I used to make and sell mohinga [a type of Burmese noodles]. With the money that I earned from selling mohinga, I was able to buy vegetables for my family. However, when the vision in my right eye vision became blurred, I could no longer make mohinga anymore. I hope that my vision will be restored after I complete my treatment.”

98% funded

98%funded
$1,470raised
$30to go