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James Clift

MONTHLY DONOR

Canada

James' Story

James joined Watsi on March 20th, 2014. Six years ago, James joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. James' most recent donation traveled 8,400 miles to support Jackson, a playful boy from Tanzania, to fund hydrocephalus treatment.

Impact

James has funded healthcare for 75 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by James

Jackson

Jackson is an 8-year-old student from Tanzania. He has been living with his grandmother since he was 2 years old as his mother and father separated and neither could care for him. His aunt describes Jackson as a very friendly and playful boy. He used to be a very active boy, always friendly, and hardworking. He would help his grandmother with home chores when he was not at school. He was in class one at school but unfortunately, his studies had to stop after he started losing consciousness and falling most of the time when at school. Jackson has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Jackson has been experiencing dizziness and he would lose consciousness and fall at school. He now cannot walk or stand and is often asleep. Without treatment, Jackson will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $765 to cover the cost of surgery for Jackson that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 16th and will drain the excess fluid from Jackson's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Jackson will hopefully continue to develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Jackson’s aunt told us, “We all wish Jackson to get this needed treatment so that he can get back to his old normal self and hopeful resume school again.”

100% funded

$765raised
Fully funded
Zin Oo

Zin Oo is a 36-year-old man who lives with his mother, younger sister, and his seven-year-old son in Mawlamyine, Burma. He is an assistant truck driver and he earns 4,000 kyat (approx. 4 USD) per day. Since the outbreak of CVOID-19, there is less work and he is only able to earn 64,000 kyat (approx. 64 USD) in a month. Zin Oo's son goes to primary school and his wife passed away last year. His mother goes house to house to see if anyone would hire her to wash their clothes. His younger sister lost her job at the factory after the outbreak of COVID-19 in Yangon. Since April, she looks after the household chores and she also works as a day laborer when she can find work. Zin Oo’s combined household income of 124,000 kyat (approx. 150 USD) in a month is just enough for their daily expenses and they cannot afford to pay the costs of basic healthcare. On August 3rd, Zin Oo was cutting firewood with an axe. While cutting the logs, his aim was off and he hit his fingers on his right hand against the log. His fingers became swollen and red after the accident, especially his small and index fingers. Without enough money to go to the hospital, Zin Oo bought traditional medicine and applied it to his fingers. He felt like his middle and ring fingers healed but his small and index fingers became more swollen and painful. Eventually when he noticed pus on his fingers, he told his friend about his problem and his friend suggested he go to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH), where treatment often cost less than other hospitals. At MLCH, the doctor completed a detailed assessment of his right hand and diagnosed him with cellulitis, a serious bacterial skin infection. The doctor told him that because of poor blood supply, he would need to amputate his small finger and probably his index finger as well. When Zin Oo told the doctor that he does not have any money to pay for the surgery, the doctor referred him to Watsi's Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) for assistance accessing treatment. Currently, the fingers on Zin Oo’s right hand are red, swollen, and warm to the touch. His fingers hurt a lot, especially his small and index finger. He cannot sleep at night without taking pain medication. He is not able to eat food with his right hand and he feels uncomfortable eating with his left hand since he is right-handed. Aside from this, Zin Oo feels stressed about his condition. He cannot work and his mother has to help look after him since he was admitted at the hospital. His mother then has no income while he receives treatment. They are worried that they will not have enough money for food and for Zin Oo’s treatment. In the future, Zin Oo wants to work as a truck driver to earn money for his family. Once he has fully recovered, he will accept any work he can find as he looks for a job as a truck driver. Zin Oo’s younger sister shared with us, “Now, I have to take care of my nephew while my mother accompanies my brother [Zin Oo] at the hospital. I cannot work and our family is worried about money. We owe our neighbor 50,000 kyat [approx. 50 USD] and we have to pay it back with 20% interest.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Philemon

Philemon is a farmer from Kenya. Philemon is a 22 year old father of one and himself is the first born child of a family of four. Being the first born child in a less fortunate family, Philemon’s roles were defined so fast that he dropped out of school so that his younger siblings could get a chance to proceed with their studies. He opted to do farming with his dad so that they can improve their humble background. Philemon is hardworking and energetic man who is depended by the family for its daily needs. Philemon was well until 9th August when he fell from a tree and sustained injury to his left leg and was diagnosed with an open proximal tibia fracture. Philemon was brought to our hospital and was received by our doctors. He underwent his first surgery to clean and close his wounds. He was then admitted to wait for ORIF surgery. He is unable to stand with his left leg. He can only walk with the able of a walker or being wheeled on a wheel chair. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On August 15th, Philemon underwent a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. He will be able to walk normally after treatment. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $968 to fund this procedure. Philemon says, “I need to walk again, I don’t have a sustainable job to feed my parents and siblings. I also want to make sure that they finish school and get proper education."

100% funded

$968raised
Fully funded