Peter KutrumbosMONTHLY DONOR
Peter's Story

Peter joined Watsi on December 9th, 2014. Six years ago, Peter joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Peter's most recent donation traveled 8,200 miles to support Grimina, a 59-year-old farmer from Uganda, to fund a thyroidectomy.

Team
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Watsi

16 members

Impact

Peter has funded healthcare for 150 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by Peter

Naw Eh is a 11-year-old girl who lives with her mother, five brother and two sisters in a refugee camp. She and her siblings study in the refugee camp while her mother weaves traditional indigenous Karen shirts to earn extra income for their household. In her free time, Naw Eh loves to play with her younger brother at home. Sometimes, she will play with her friends close to her house. She wants to be an English teacher at a primary school in the future. In late July 2021, Naw Eh went out to buy some snacks from a shop. On the way to the shop, she slipped and fell on the muddy road. When she fell she hurt her left leg. Since she was able to walk slowly, the medic in the camp did not think her leg was broken and only gave her pain medication. On 19 August 2021, Naw Eh lost her grip when she was sitting down in a chair and fell down. This time she could not stand up or walk. After a doctor at Mae Sariang Hospital diagnosed her with a fractured femur, she was referred to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment. At that hospital, the doctor told Naw Eh's brother that they want to do an MRI of her leg to check if she has any underlying conditions that caused her to break her femur so easily. With support from Watsi, the MRI was possible and now the surgeon has determined that surgery is required to help her leg heal properly. Currently, Naw Eh suffers from pain in her left leg and she cannot move or put weight on that leg. If she moves her leg, the pain increases. Her brother needs to help her use the bedpan as she cannot walk to the toilet. He also needs to help her get dressed. She is taking pain medication to help her sleep at night. She is worried that if her condition is not treated properly, she will never be able to walk again. She misses going to school and wants to continue her studies in grade four once her school reopens. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Naw Eh will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for September 2nd and will cost $1,500. After surgery, Naw Eh will no longer experience pain in her leg and she will be able to get herself dress and be able to walk to the toilet. Naw Eh said, "I am worried that if I do not receive surgery and receive proper treatment, I will not be able to walk again."

91%funded
$1,378raised
$122to go

Kishimwi is a playful and friendly young boy who is currently having a hard time walking. Kishimwi has a younger sibling, and his parents are small-scale maize and vegetable farmers who grow food for their family. His father also works as a hawker selling Maasai beads, belts and sandals in order to make extra income. Kishimwi was diagnosed with genu valgus, causing his legs to bend inward to form knock knees. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. Kishimwi's parents noticed a slight bent in his leg when he was three years old, but became alarmed when the problem worsened over the past year to the point where walking became difficult. Kishimwi experiences pain when participating in daily activities, so his parents decided to seek treatment for him at a local hospital in their village. The family was advised to give Kishimwi foods containing high calcium and calcium supplements to strengthen his bones and prevent his legs from bending further. However, the effects were negligible and Kishimwi's legs became more bent. Fortunately, an older patient's parent told the family about Watsi's medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC), and the family traveled to the hospital hoping for treatment. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Kishimwi. The procedure will take place on June 29th. Treatment will hopefully restore Kishimwi's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Kishimwi’s father hopes his son's pain will be alleviated after this care, "We have used medication and foods containing high calcium but none has helped. Please help treat my son because as you can see his legs are badly affected."

$880raised
Fully funded

Ryan is a playful and happy two-year-old from Kenya. In their small family of three, he is his parent’s source of joy and their only child. When Ryan was around nine months old, his parents realized that he had a condition affecting his testes. They shared that initially to them, the condition was not alarming. His parents decided to wait and see if his testicles would descend on their own. After waiting for around two months, Ryan’s parents took him to a nearby facility for a checkup. Ryan was diagnosed with bilateral undescended testicles. The physician advised them to wait for at least one year before taking any action in the hope that they would heal naturally. When no change took place, a friend recommended their family come to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center BethanyKids Hospital for the surgery Ryan needed. At BethanyKids, Ryan was examined and has been scheduled for surgery. If his condition is left untreated, the testicles may be damaged hence leading to other diseases and later affecting his fertility limiting his ability to have a family of his own. Ryan’s father delivers milk to a local milk factory as a truck driver and in his line of work, the income is very little. To add on their family's earnings, Ryan’s mother works in a nearby salon. Ryan's family is not able to raise the required amount for his surgery and are appealing for financial help. Ryan has been diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Ryan has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. Ryan will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on December 31st. AMHF is requesting $569 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Ryan’s mother says, “As a parent, I want the best for my child in future but the finances required for his surgery are unavailable. We are requesting for any available financial help we can get so that our son can get the required treatment.”

$569raised
Fully funded