catherine runnelsMONTHLY DONOR
catherine's Story

catherine joined Watsi on November 27th, 2013. Five years ago, catherine joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. catherine's most recent donation supported Kidus, happy baby boy from Ethiopia, to treat his birth condition of his bladder.

Impact

catherine has funded healthcare for 67 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by catherine

Kidus is a cute baby boy who loves to walk. His dad enjoys walking with him and holding his hand, and Kidus loves it when his mom carries him on her back. He also loves to watch cartoons. Kidus's dad and mom love each other so much and have a happy life together. Kidus's father is a tailor. His income is very limited and barely enough to sustain the family through the month, but love fills their home, and their lives, with happiness. When Kidus was born his parents learned that he had bladder exstrophy, a rare condition where children are born with an open bladder. His parents faced a challenge that they did not expect in their life, but they are facing it with courage. Kidus needs surgery to perform a procedure to divert his urination to the anal opening & make a pouch bladder from the bowel. He will undergo this surgery on September 28th with our medical partner African Mission Healthcare (AMH) and his family needs $1,500 for the procedure. Kidus's dad said, “For thirteen days after his birth we worked hard to get him treatment but no one in the health centres could help us. Some health workers gave us hope and some health workers did not give us any hope." He is hopeful for after surgery, “After he gets his surgery and recovers I want to tell him the truth about his condition and what we went through as a result of it when he grows up. Also, I want to tell him how he got the treatment, about the people who helped him, how God helped him and gave him this healthy life. I will tell him this so he grows up grateful and he lives to support and help others. I want him to be good and caring and God-fearing. I want him to be there for others. I believe kindness is contagious.”

99%funded
$1,493raised
$7to go

Kyaw is a one-year-old boy from Thailand. He lives with his father, grandmother, uncle and brother in a village in Tak Province, Thailand. His father and uncle are day laborers while his grandmother is a homemaker. Kyaw’s 13-year-old brother also helps out with household chores. In the middle of November 2020, Kyaw developed a fever, cough and difficulty breathing. His grandmother treated him with traditional medicine but Kyaw did not get better. His grandmother then took him to a clinic in the village, where he received oral medication for a week. Once he completed the medication, Kyaw still was not better. His grandmother then took him to another clinic where he received a blood test, fluid through an intravenous (IV) infusion, and oxygen. After the doctor checked his results, Kyaw was diagnosed with anemia and he was admitted. He received a blood transfusion, but Kyaw still did not get better. The medic then referred him to another hospital where he was also admitted and received tests and treatment. When Kyaw did not get better, the doctor referred him to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH). After Kyaw arrived at MSH in an ambulance in early December, he was admitted. At the hospital, Kyaw received an x-ray, oxygen and antibiotics. After checking his x-ray result, the doctor diagnosed Kyaw with congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), where a mass forms during pregnancy in one of the lungs of the fetus. The doctor told Kyaw’s grandmother that Kyaw could have a mass or cyst in his right lung in addition to a build-up of fluid in that lung. The doctor then inserted a tube into his right lung which was connected to a bag to drain the fluid. After the procedure, the doctor told Kyaw’s grandmother that they would remove the tube when no more fluid would drain from his lungs. When Kyaw did not get better, the doctor referred him to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment. Doctors want Kyaw to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. After a long journey and many treatments, this scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $693 to cover the cost of Kyaw's CT scan and hospital care, scheduled for February 1st. “I want to see him free from this suffering,” said Kyaw’s grandmother. “Once Kyaw recovers and is older, I will send him to school. I want him to become an educated person because I do not want him to work as a day labourer and work under the hot sun like his father.”

$693raised
Fully funded

Eustase is a 40-year-old man from Kenya. He is married and has three children aged 16, 10, and 5 years of age. All of his children are currently in school. Eustase was involved in a tragic road accident while on a boda-boda (motocycle taxi) drive. Rushing to pick up a client, Eustase was sandwiched between a lorry and a matatu (public service van) on a highway a few kilometres from his home town. The driver was trying to pass Eustase when the lorry hit him. He sustained serious injuries that rendered him unconscious. Well-wishers rushed him to a nearby hospital for first aid and review and later to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Kijabe Hospital. After several tests and an x-ray, he was diagnosed with a right tibia fracture. Doctors recommended a series of surgeries by both orthopaedic and plastic surgery teams. So far, Eustase has gone through three surgeries. Unless he undergoes the complete series of surgeries scheduled, he is at risk of not being able to walk or work. Eustase has already undergone right femur IM nailing and tibia ex-fix; debridement of his wounds and skin grafting; and 1st stage bone transport surgeries in an attempt to normalize his life. Currently, he is able to walk with crutches, and has been under close review by the plastic and orthopaedic teams. Next, Eustase is scheduled to undergo a second stage bone transport to enable his bones to heal normally and allow him to gain strength to walk. However, these procedures are very costly for Eustase and his family. He runs a boda-boda business to make a living and feed his family, but his daily wage is low and he does not have enough to pay for the surgeries. Their family depends on this sole source of income for survival. He has not been able to work since his motorbike was destroyed during the accident. Eustase has been relying on his national health insurance medical coverage, but has depleted his funding allocation and is therefore unable to get additional help. His friends and relatives have helped supplement his rising medical costs. Eustase requests for assistance to meet the cost of his planned surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,500 to fund Eustase's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to regain his ability to walk and significantly improve his quality of life. Eustace shared, “This procedure will help me be able to get back to normal and even walk again. My family depends on me, and with this fracture, I am not able to work or even take care of them.“

$1,500raised
Fully funded