Zachary Orion Segal
Zachary's Story

Zachary joined Watsi on September 8th, 2014. 72 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Zachary's most recent donation traveled 9,000 miles to support Grey, a farmer from Malawi, for prostate surgery.

Impact

Zachary has funded healthcare for 35 patients in 9 countries.

All patients funded by Zachary

Di Par is a 14-year-old boy who lives with his mother and three brothers in Burma. He enjoys playing marbles, snapping rubber bands with his younger brothers, listening to music, and visiting with his friends. Di Par enjoys school, but he is only in grade five since his health condition makes it difficult for him to keep up with his classes. Di Par did not present with symptoms until he was five years old. He was easily tired, especially after playing, but his mother did not think it was out of the ordinary and did not seek medical attention for him. When Di Par was 10 years old, the symptoms worsened as he began having difficulty breathing in addition to the fatigue. His mother took him to the clinic where they listened to his heart and detected abnormal heart sounds. He was prescribed medication that seemed to improve his condition, so his mother did not seek further evaluation. In March of 2016, Di Par appeared to go into shock and lost consciousness, and he was brought to the hospital. Although a definitive diagnosis was not made, the physicians thought Di Par might have meningitis and treated him medically. While he was in the hospital, he received a battery of exams: blood tests, urinalysis, CT scan, and X-rays. He also received an echocardiogram, which provided the diagnosis of congestive heart disease — severe tricuspid regurgitation with severe pulmonary stenosis. Di Par was in the hospital for 12 days, and family members helped his mother and brothers pay the hospital costs. Since his hospitalization, Di Par has been experiencing palpitations, fatigue, and difficulty breathing. He is at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in the children’s inpatient department. He is also cyanotic with a bluish tinge to his lips and fingers. After evaluation by the medics at MTC, he was referred to Burma Children Medical Fund for surgical consideration. Di Par and his family have lived in their current village for three months; they moved there to be closer to his mother’s sister and to improve chances for employment. Di Par's father passed away several years ago, so the family's financial support comes from his mother, who sells vegetables and flowers in the market, and his older brother, who works as a day laborer. Despite their hard work, the money they earn does not cover daily expenses, savings, or health care costs. His mother has to borrow money at 10 percent interest to meet those costs and is currently in debt. Di Par’s mother is very concerned about him, as he is falling further and further behind with his studies and, more importantly, his condition is becoming more severe. His mother and older brother alternate caring for Di Par, and his younger brothers help with family chores. This arrangement has not yet affected their work schedules, but Di Par's condition will only complicate the family's needs as further care is needed. For $1,500, Di Par will undergo surgery to replace the damaged heart valve and restore proper blood flow through his heart and lungs. Funding also covers the cost of 12 pre- and post-operative consultations, transportation to and from the hospital, and nine days of hospital care after surgery. Di Par's mother looks forward to a successful operation for her son. "My son enjoys teaching his brothers," she shares, "so when he grows up, he may become a teacher in the village."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Meet Hezron, a 19-month-old boy who lives with his mother and older sibling in Kenya. “Hezron was born with an abnormal urethral opening, forcing him to pee with a lot of difficulty,” explains our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). “His mother sought treatment when he was six months old, but she could not raise the required funds for his treatment.” Hezron’s condition, known as hypospadias, is characterized by a urethral opening on the underside of the penis instead of at the tip and often contributes to other health issues. “If not treated,” AMHF explains, “Hezron is likely to suffer urinary tract infections. He will also not be able to pass urine normally.” To treat hypospadias, a surgeon takes tissue grafts from the foreskin or from the inside of the mouth to extend the length of the urethra so that it opens at the tip of the penis. After surgery, “Hezron will be able to pass urine normally,” explains AMHF. “The risk of urinary tract infections will also be minimized.” Hezron’s mother, who sells second-hand clothes to support her family, has not been able to raise the total funds required to pay for the surgery that Hezron needs. $655 pays for Hezron to undergo surgery to repair the hypospadias as well as 10 days of hospital care after surgery. Family and friends have contributed $215 to cover additional costs associated with his care. “I try to give my children the best,” Herzon's mother says. “I have no one to look up to, and I’ll appreciate any support.”

$655raised
Fully funded

The only child of his family, two-year-old Charles lives with his mother in Kenya. As a single parent, Charles’ mother works hard to support him by washing clothes for families in their community. Due to a neurological condition called hydrocephalus, Charles faces the possibility of experiencing developmental delays, our medical partner African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF) reports. Hydrocephalus results when part of the brain becomes blocked and causes fluid to build up. When this occurs, the brain swells and the head increases in size. AMHF explains that Charles’ condition leads to frequent headaches and irritability. According to AMHF, Charles first showed signs of hydrocephalus at seven months old. Unsure what to do, Charles’ mother eventually sought medical help and was informed that surgical intervention was necessary to allow Charles to lead a healthy childhood. With $600, Charles will receive surgery to treat his hydrocephalus and provide him the opportunity to grow normally. Using a widely practiced shunt procedure, the excess fluid in Charles’ brain will be drained out. In addition to surgery, the total cost of this operation includes five days of intensive hospital care as well as all of the necessary laboratory tests to closely monitor Charles’ recovery. AMHF states, “Charles’ surgery will help eliminate the pressure impact on his brain, and allow him live quality life.” “I feel helpless when I hear my two-year-old son crying and screaming ‘Mama, Mama’ holding his head. His pain because of his headache resonates in my mind. Please help him get treated,” shares Charles’ mother.

$600raised
Fully funded

Meet Louise, a 75-year-old grandmother from Kenya! When she was younger, Louise worked very hard to save enough money to purchase a small plot of farmland. According to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), Louise now uses this land “to plant potatoes for her own consumption and sell any surplus at the local market.” However, due to breast cancer, Louise is no longer able to farm as much as she would like to. After discovering a growing lump in her right breast, Louise visited AMHF’s clinic and was diagnosed with breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women, although the exact causes of the disease are not known. This cancer—which usually originates in the innermost part of the breast (where milk is produced)—may present itself in the form of a lump, a rash, redness or other unusual changes in the breast area. In addition to her cancer, Louise is also experiencing shoulder pain that “makes it difficult for Louise to work on the farm,” AMHF states. “Luckily, tests have shown that the cancer has not progressed aggressively over the last few years,” AMHF reports. “If treated soon, there is a very high chance that all of the cancer can be removed and Louise will not be at risk of the cancer spreading to her other organs.” With $740, Louise will receive a mastectomy to remove her right breast. As Louise has locally advanced breast cancer, this is an effective treatment to remove the cancerous tissue and prevent the problem from returning. Included as part of her treatment, Louise will receive six days of intensive hospital care to ease her into a safe recovery. Following her treatment and recovery, “We expect that Louise will be able to work on her farm again,” states AMHF. Indeed, after regaining her strength, Louise fully plans to return to farming her land once again. She shares, “I like being able to take care of myself. However, with this increasing shoulder pain, I can no longer work on my farm.”

$740raised
Fully funded

“John is a beautiful little boy living with his father,” shares our medical partner in Haiti, Project Medishare (PM). Just eight years old, John is in severe respiratory distress. “Twelve months ago John fell on a rock while biking in his neighborhood, and his parents did not take him to the hospital because they did not have money and it was not severe,” PM explains. “A few days later John started having difficulties breathing and his belly, face and foot started swelling.” When his father saw this, he took John to the hospital where he was given oxygen. However, pus in his right lung is still preventing him from breathing normally. In order for John to recover, he must receive surgery to remove the pus. “John's father is working very hard to raise money for him,” PM tells us. “He has to walk under the hot sun of Haiti every day, selling used stuff.” John’s father shares, “I fix stuff I find to sell in order to get money to feed my kid. I only came to the hospital with John hoping to receive free care because he was very sick; when they said to me that it is a private hospital and that I have to pay, I thought about going back home because I have no money. 
” Thankfully, John’s father does not have to take his son home. With $1,500 in funding, PM explains, “Treatment will consist of a thoracic drainage by surgical intervention.” First, the pus will be drained from John’s lung. Second, John will be given antibiotics to treat the infection. Finally, he will rejoin his family and resume his healthy life. “This surgery will save John’s life,” PM shares. Let’s fund this life-saving treatment and allow John to live a normal childhood—without pain and respiratory distress.

$1,500raised
Fully funded