Sanjay DastoorMONTHLY DONOR
Sanjay's Story

Sanjay joined Watsi on March 21st, 2017. Four years ago, Sanjay joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Sanjay's most recent donation supported Nin, an active athlete from Cambodia, to fund a nerve reconstruction surgery to restore use of his arm and hand.

Impact

Sanjay has funded healthcare for 56 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Sanjay

Kelvin is a bright second grade student and the last born in a family of five. His mother told us that Kelvin likes playing football, reading, and running together with his friends. Kelvin's mother is now a single mom after she separated from her husband many years ago after he engaged in drugs and frequent drinking. “He could not provide for the family anymore...” Kelvin's mother told us. Currently, Kelvin's mother has a small makeshift hotel, known as a Kibanda, where she sells tea, porridge, and mandazi (doughnuts) which is just enough to sustain her children and pay for their house rent. Kelvin has a hemiplegic cerebral palsy condition. When Kelvin was one year old, his mother noticed a bending of the left foot, and as he continued to grow his left foot worsened. Recently, while Kelvin was passing by the market in the village, a lady spotted him and inquired about where he lived. She later called Kelvin's mother and advised her to visit CURE hospital. At the hospital, Kelvin was scheduled to undergo surgery. Fortunately, Kelvin traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, AIC Cure International Hospital. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on August 19th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,286 to fund Kelvin's treatment. After treatment, he will be able to walk well and play with friends. He will also be able to continue with his studies uninterrupted. Kelvin's mother said, “I am seeking support because I cannot pay the hospital bill, if I can be helped, I will be grateful to see my son walking normally.”

92%funded
$1,192raised
$94to go

Thomas is a very charming, playful, and friendly 6-year-old. He's the second-born in a family of four children. His parents say he has been requesting for them to send him to school like his older brother, but they have not been able to enroll him in kindergarten due to his health condition. Both of his parents are small-scale farmers of maize and vegetables, which they use mainly for their food and only sell some of their harvest to be able to buy other basics. Thomas was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus. This condition started when Thomas was three years old, and over time his legs have worsened. His legs have curved inwards, forming knock knees. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, Thomas now walks with a gait and has pain after a long day of play and walking. Thomas' parents initially wanted to seek treatment for him, but the village health clinic was not able to treat the condition and advised them to go to a referral hospital. This posed some financial challenges. Fortunately, through a community outreach program of Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center called Plaster House, Thomas was able to be sent to ALMC Hospital, traveling over twelve hours from their village. Thomas has been scheduled to have both of his legs corrected through surgery, but his parents cannot afford the cost of his care and are in need of financial support. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Thomas. The procedure is scheduled to take place on April 20th. Treatment will hopefully restore Thomas's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Thomas’ father shared, "We wish to see our son walk well like other normal children, but due to financial challenges we have not been able to afford his treatment cost. Please help us."

$880raised
Fully funded

U Win is a 54-year-old man who lives with his wife and youngest son in the Ayeyarwaddy Division in Burma. He has three sons and three daughters, with five of his children already married and working. His 17-year-old son left school because they were unable to pay school fees, and worked as a day laborer until COVID-19 happened. U Win used to work as a day laborer as well, but stopped working around two years ago due to his health condition. His family survives on 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) each month that U Win's three other daughters and another son send them, enough to cover their basic expenses. In January 2012, U Win felt tired, had a headache, suffered from heart palpitations, and a rapid heartbeat. He went to a clinic where the doctor listened to his heart with a stethoscope and checked his blood pressure. U Win was told that he has high blood pressure and that he would need to take oral medication for a long time. He received an injection, oral medication, and another appointment for more medication. After he took the medication, he felt better and he went back to work. However, U Win continued to experience worsening symptoms over the next few years, returning to clinics and receiving the same treatment. He was told at one point to visit a cardiologist, but did not do so until later on. In August 2020, during another clinic visit in Yangon, the doctor diagnosed U Win with an atrial septal defect, and said that he would need to receive surgery to repair this hole in his heart. If not treated, the condition could weaken his heart further and cause lung problems later on. He was unable to receive surgery in November due to an upsurge in COVID-19 cases, and was also told the procedure would cost about 3,000,000 kyat (approx. 3,000 USD). Luckily, U Win’s wife remembered that there is a charity group in Yangon that might be able to help. The group told him about our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, to look for assistance with accessing the treatment he needed. U Win currently experiences chest pain and back pain, has no appetite, and cannot sleep well at night. He appeals for financial support for his cost of care. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 20th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, his quality of life will significantly improve and he will be able to return to work. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. U Win shared, “I want to get better soon so that I can work for my family again. I am worried about my family’s future because we cannot find work in the village. My son also cannot go to Yangon to find another job because of COVID-19 travel restrictions.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded