Ariel
Ariel's Story

Ariel joined Watsi on December 18th, 2015. 159 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Ariel's most recent donation supported Ally, a baby boy from Tanzania, so he can walk normally when he grows up.

Impact

Ariel has funded healthcare for 6 patients in 4 countries.

All patients funded by Ariel

Kyi Soe is a 42-year-old woman who lives with her husband in Burma. Her husband works in construction building houses, and her daughter works as a factory worker in Thailand. When Kyi Soe visited her daughter in Thailand last year, she began to experience intense pain in her abdomen and lower back. Since then, Kyi Soe's symptoms have only gotten worse-- she has been having very heavy bleeding, nausea, and cannot lay down comfortably. Despite her continuing symptoms, Kyi Soe was hesitant to go to a hospital because she knew it would be very expensive. Instead she returned to Burma and visited a local clinic. After a series of tests, the midwife told her that she would need surgery to remove the mass that was in her uterus-- surgery Kyi Soe was unable to afford. So she just left with pain medication, and an expensive medical bill. Kyi Soe had to stop working since her symptoms started. Her husband's income is not enough to even meet their daily needs, so they had to take out loans to pay for her medical bills. But without proper surgery, the mass in Kyi Soe's abdomen may grow and cause further complications. After hearing about Burma Border Projects (BBP) from her daughter's friend, Kyi Soe moved in with her daughter so that she could receive surgery. For $1500, doctors will remove the mass growing in her uterus. This will relieve her pain and other symptoms. Despite the stress that Kyi Soe and her family have had addressing her condition, they are looking forward to her finally receiving proper medical treatment. When she recovers, she will be able to return to living with her daughter in Thailand, where her husband is also hoping to find a job.

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Jonalyn is a happy, 13-year-old student who loves to study and play a game similar to kick-the-can. She lives with her parents and two siblings in the Philippines, where their one-room house has a cement floor and a thatched roof made of nipa leaves. Jonalyn noticed a mass on the right side of neck when she was 12 years old. She told her mother about it, but they did not seek help since they did not have money to spend on medical consultations or medicine. After a few months, she complained of pain when swallowing and difficulty breathing and also noticed that the mass on her neck was getting bigger. She has been unable to concentrate during her classes because of the on-and-off throbbing pain in her neck. During a church activity in May of 2015, Jonalyn felt a throbbing pain in her neck and was examined by a doctor. She was diagnosed with a goiter—an enlarged thyroid gland usually caused by a deficiency of iodine, an important element in the production of thyroid hormones that regulate the body's metabolism. The doctor prescribed an antibiotic for seven days and iron supplements for 10 days and referred Jonalyn to another care facility to undergo tests to determine the type of goiter. Unfortunately, the family was unable to seek further care for Jonalyn until now. She was screened by a health trainer in one of our sponsored communities, consultation was facilitated, and she was advised to undergo a thyroidectomy to remove the thyroid gland. Jonalyn's mother is a housewife, and her father raises pigs. They cannot pay for surgery for Jonalyn because their income is barely enough to sustain the family's daily needs. $1,500 covers the cost of Jonalyn's surgery, transportation to and from the hospital, 10 days of hospital care—including medicine, imaging, and blood tests—and medicine to take after she goes home. The surgery will lessen Jonalyn's discomfort due to her condition. "I am very thankful to you for helping people like me in my condition, especially those who are not financially capable in terms of health treatment," shares Jonalyn. "I was truly blessed because I was given an opportunity to be treated. After the surgery, I plan to continue my schooling to reach my dreams and help my family someday."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Wat Way Di is a 23-year-old woman living in a refugee camp in Thailand with some extended family members. She was born in Burma to a family of three siblings and her father. Wat Way Di primarily relies on the food and healthcare provided by the refugee camp. Three years ago, Wat Way Di started feeling fatigue, chest pain, and dizziness. She was unable to walk far without becoming short of breath. At times she had trouble sleeping and eating. She had to stop her schooling due to her symptoms, and has been living with her relatives in the camp. She is unable to work and at times has difficulty doing basic chores around the house, like cooking dinner. She also is unable to carry water in the camp, which is vital for their water supply. She returned to Burma last year to become a midwife, but was unable to complete her classes, and is now unemployed. Wat Way Di likes to draw and, when possible, she draws different pictures. She went to the camp's clinic, and was referred to a local hospital for further evaluation. She was then found with non-rheumatic mitral stenosis, and was recommended for cardiac surgery. Mitral stenosis is when the mitral valve of the heart becomes narrow and dysfunctional, blocking blood flow into the main pumping chamber. Wat Way Di could not afford the procedure, and since then she has been on prescription medication. She currently treks to the hospital every two months to refill her prescriptions. Two years ago, Wat Way Di tried seeking treatment for her symptoms in Burma while visiting her family, but after some imaging testing she was sent home without receiving any treatment. Wat Way Di explains that it is difficult for her family to access healthcare in Burma because they must have payment in full at the time of treatment. For $1,500, Wat Way Di can have the surgery she needs. After she fully recovers, Wat Way Di anticipates being well enough to work as a midwife. "I hope that once I receive surgery I can return to my village in Burma, become a midwife, and take care of women and children," Wat Way Di says. "I believe that I can support my family through my work as a midwife."

$1,500raised
Fully funded