Tyler Baldwin
Tyler's Story

Tyler joined Watsi on March 21st, 2016. 63 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Tyler's most recent donation supported John, a student from Philippines, for hernia repair surgery.

Impact

Tyler has funded healthcare for 9 patients in 6 countries.

All patients funded by Tyler

Meet John, a seven-year-old boy from the Philippines. John is an active child who loves to roam around and play with other children. He also enjoys drawing and playing with toy trucks. When John was eight months old, his parents noticed something wrong with his scrotum. When they brought him to a pediatrician, their son was diagnosed with a hernia, or a protrusion of the intestinal tissue through the abdominal wall. The doctor advised to seek surgical care for their son. They did not have the financial ability to seek care at that time, and were also worried that something unexpected would happen during the operation. However, they were aided financially by a missionary and John underwent a successful operation. Everything was well until John was two years old. His hernia reappeared on the left side, leaving his mother fearful and scared to let her son out of her sight. When his parents brought him to the doctor, they were told that John should be prohibited from too much playing, running, and crying. These restrictions were a large burden, as John's parents know that a child his age wants the freedom to play and explore. John's mother often stops him from playing and running outside, which causes him frustration. She sometimes cries when she sees him sadly looking through the window at the other children playing. John's parents were delighted when they were referred to Watsi's medical partner, International Care Ministries. After a series of tests, the doctor recommended hernia repair surgery-- a $962 procedure during which John's herniated tissue will be returned to the abdominal cavity. Once he has healed from his surgery, John will be free from the pain he now experiences and able to return to his regular activities. The only income provider in the family is John's father, who works as a helper in a storehouse. He earns $110 per month, which is barely enough for the family's basic needs, let alone the cost of his son's operation. As a result, the family requires assistance to afford this important procedure. John loves his family very much and he always hugs and makes sweet comments to his parents when he sees them tired or sad. His mother wants to see John free from his condition and enjoying his childhood years. She hopes that he can explore and make friends. "Thank you so much in advance for this," says John's mother. "It means so much to us. I hope and pray this will be the last surgery that John will undergo and that he will be free from his illness."

$962raised
Fully funded

"Dylan is suffering from malnutrition, meaning that he is much too small for his age," says our medical partner, Wuqu' Kawoq (WK). "Not only has his physical grown been stunted, but he also has a weak immune system due to a lack of protein, calories, and nutrients." Dylan is a nine-month-old baby who lives in rural Guatemala with his parents. He's the youngest of two children. His father works in the fields as a day laborer where he earns a few dollars a day when work is available. His parents don't have the resources to feed him fruits, vegetables or eggs needed to maintain healthy growth. WK explains, "Unfortunately, malnutrition also decreases his appetite--Dylan's mother says that she has to struggle with him to get him to eat. If Dylan does not receive treatment, he could face the consequences for the rest of his life—such as short stature as an adult, lower IQ, a harder time focusing, and have trouble in school--all making it more likely that he will have lower-paying job as an adult and have children who are also malnourished." For $512, we can enroll Dylan in WK's malnutrition therapy program, which will provide growth monitoring, food supplements and deworming medication, allowing him to resume normal growth. If he's treated now, he can resume normal mental and physical development. "His parents will receive motivational nutrition education so they can learn how to best feed Dylan, even with the little resources they have," WK says. "This treatment will give Dylan a better chance of escaping the cycle of malnutrition and poverty," WK says.

$512raised
Fully funded

Even though Marlin is almost 6 months old, she is the size of an average three-month-old. This is because she is suffering from malnutrition, which prevents her from growing and developing normally. In addition to stunted growth, her immune system is weak from the lack of protein, calories, and nutrients in her diet, making a normal cold or cough much more dangerous for her than a healthy child. If left untreated, the effects of malnutrition could could stick with her for the rest of her life--such as increased risk of chronic diseases, low IQ, and a higher likelihood of dropping out of school. Marlin lives with her parents and two older siblings in a one-room house made of wood with a tin roof in Guatemala. Her mother works taking care of Marlin and her siblings, cooking, and cleaning. Her father works as a day laborer, only making a couple dollars per day. Although they want the best for her, they cannot afford to give her even one piece of fruit, vegetable, or egg per day--making it impossible for her to overcome her malnutrition without treatment. Growth monitoring, micronutrients and food supplementation will help Marlin recover from malnutrition. She will gain weight and grow taller to catch up with other children her age. Her immune system will grow stronger with the increased caloric intake. This will further increase her appetite and help her use the extra calories to develop mentally instead of those calories being wasted on getting over frequent bouts of diarrhea. Her parents will receive the support they need to feel empowered to give Marlin the diet she needs to grow and develop healthily, even with their limited resources. Intervention now will prevent the future devastating effects of malnutrition, and give Marlin the chance to live a healthy and productive life, finish school, get a good job, and escape the cycle of malnutrition and poverty that made her sick in the first place.

$512raised
Fully funded

Di Par is a 14-year-old boy who lives with his mother and three brothers in Burma. He enjoys playing marbles, snapping rubber bands with his younger brothers, listening to music, and visiting with his friends. Di Par enjoys school, but he is only in grade five since his health condition makes it difficult for him to keep up with his classes. Di Par did not present with symptoms until he was five years old. He was easily tired, especially after playing, but his mother did not think it was out of the ordinary and did not seek medical attention for him. When Di Par was 10 years old, the symptoms worsened as he began having difficulty breathing in addition to the fatigue. His mother took him to the clinic where they listened to his heart and detected abnormal heart sounds. He was prescribed medication that seemed to improve his condition, so his mother did not seek further evaluation. In March of 2016, Di Par appeared to go into shock and lost consciousness, and he was brought to the hospital. Although a definitive diagnosis was not made, the physicians thought Di Par might have meningitis and treated him medically. While he was in the hospital, he received a battery of exams: blood tests, urinalysis, CT scan, and X-rays. He also received an echocardiogram, which provided the diagnosis of congestive heart disease — severe tricuspid regurgitation with severe pulmonary stenosis. Di Par was in the hospital for 12 days, and family members helped his mother and brothers pay the hospital costs. Since his hospitalization, Di Par has been experiencing palpitations, fatigue, and difficulty breathing. He is at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in the children’s inpatient department. He is also cyanotic with a bluish tinge to his lips and fingers. After evaluation by the medics at MTC, he was referred to Burma Children Medical Fund for surgical consideration. Di Par and his family have lived in their current village for three months; they moved there to be closer to his mother’s sister and to improve chances for employment. Di Par's father passed away several years ago, so the family's financial support comes from his mother, who sells vegetables and flowers in the market, and his older brother, who works as a day laborer. Despite their hard work, the money they earn does not cover daily expenses, savings, or health care costs. His mother has to borrow money at 10 percent interest to meet those costs and is currently in debt. Di Par’s mother is very concerned about him, as he is falling further and further behind with his studies and, more importantly, his condition is becoming more severe. His mother and older brother alternate caring for Di Par, and his younger brothers help with family chores. This arrangement has not yet affected their work schedules, but Di Par's condition will only complicate the family's needs as further care is needed. For $1,500, Di Par will undergo surgery to replace the damaged heart valve and restore proper blood flow through his heart and lungs. Funding also covers the cost of 12 pre- and post-operative consultations, transportation to and from the hospital, and nine days of hospital care after surgery. Di Par's mother looks forward to a successful operation for her son. "My son enjoys teaching his brothers," she shares, "so when he grows up, he may become a teacher in the village."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Linda is suffering from malnutrition and as a result her appetite and energy are low. Her weight and her height are far below the average for her age, and without intervention she is at risk of the long-term effects of malnutrition. Her mental and physical growth will be permanently stunted, preventing her from reaching her full potential. Her family already struggles to afford the most basic necessities, so if her health declines further, they will be unable to afford a hospital visit or doctor appointment. Her mother told our staff that she wants to do all she can for her daughter, but is just unsure at times what would be best and where their money is best spent to buy the most nutritious foods possible. Linda loves to play- she especially likes to pretend to cook, and imitates her mom making tortillas. She likes to eat beans and eggs, although eggs are difficult for her family to afford often. She lives with her parents and two siblings (ages 6 and 4 years old) in a small concrete block and wood panel house, with a metal lamina roof. This treatment will supply Linda with the growth monitoring, micronutrient and food supplementation, and medication for her to recoup some of the weight and height he has lost. Her parents will receive intensive nutrition education thus building their confidence and ability to care for Linda and her siblings throughout their childhood. Intervention now will prevent the future devastating effects of malnutrition, and give Linda the chance to live a healthy productive life.

$512raised
Fully funded

Myo Win is a three-year-old boy who was born, and has lived most of his life, in Bangkok. He has three siblings; a sister and two brothers. The family relocated to their home in Burma when Myo Win’s grandmother passed away, and his parents have been working as day laborers on a farm. The family relies heavily on financial assistance from the Myo Win’s uncle who lives and works in Bangkok. Three months after birth, Myo Win developed a fever and was vomiting intermittently. They sought treatment at the Thai hospital; however, the symptoms worsened after several days as he suffered seizures and his head began to swell. Myo Win's parents did not return to the hospital as they lacked a health card and money, so they approached their employer in Bangkok who contacted several media outlets for help. The plea for public help was successful and Myo Win was seen by two different hospitals in Bangkok. At the second hospital, they noticed the increase in head size and intracranial pressure, so surgery was performed to insert a shunt to direct the cranial fluid to the abdomen. He was in the hospital for 25 days. Myo Win’s condition seemed to stabilize. Treatment in Bangkok was free as the public response covered the expenses. However in October of 2015, after the family moved back to Burma, he began to experience seizures, fever and vomiting attacks. The family took Myo Win to several different clinics for treatment, where it was found that Myo Win's shunt was malfunctioning due to blockage or infection. The only hospital able to perform surgery was out of financial reach for Myo Win's family. They were referred to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), a Watsi partner, and told that Myo Win could receive surgery without charge through the Watsi program. Myo Win's present symptoms include abdominal pain, irritability, vomiting, constipation and difficulty urinating. $1,485 will cover the cost of the treatment Myo Win needs to get healthy. After the surgery, Myo Win will hopefully be able to run and play with his sister again. "My hope for my son is that he goes to school for an education and becomes a teacher," his mother said.

$1,485raised
Fully funded

Sethi is a 36-year-old refugee from Congo who currently lives in Kenya. He came to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), seeking answers to debilitating symptoms such as headaches, vision impairment, and difficulty walking. When Sethi left Congo, he was separated from his six children and has not been able to locate them. He left all of his possessions behind and has had to move in with a distant relative who supports his own wife and two children by selling second-hand clothes. “[Sethi’s relative] has not been able to go to work consistently, as he has to take care of Sethi and his wife, who is expecting,” says AMHF. AMHF diagnosed Sethi with a brain tumor. Fortunately, the tumor is benign. However, “Sethi has been experiencing painful migraines,” AMHF tells us. “His vision has been partially impaired, and he has to walk with the assistance of someone else.” To remove the tumor, doctors plan to perform two surgical procedures during a single operation. In one procedure—a craniotomy—doctors will remove a portion of his skull to access the tumor. In the second procedure—transsphenoidal surgery—doctors will insert surgical instruments through his nose and into the sphenoid sinus cavity at the base of his brain. “If not treated,” continues AMHF, “Sethi will continue suffering from painful migraines with a possibility of being permanently blind. The brain tumor may also ultimately result in death.” $1,205 pays for surgery for Sethi as well as six days of hospital care—two days in intensive care and four days in the general ward—after surgery. Funding also covers the costs of medicine, blood work, and pathology. Sethi is providing $306 to pay for additional costs associated with his care. “After the surgery and recovery,” says AMHF, “Sethi will no longer suffer migraines, and he may regain his vision.” “Sethi hopes to get well to trace his family and help other people who might also be in need like himself,” shares Sethi’s relative.

$1,205raised
Fully funded