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Watsi Volunteers

Spreading healthcare around the world, one patient profile at a time.

533 Patients Funded

$8632 Total Donated

53 Members

Mission

We're a team of writers, doctors, students, and working professionals on a mission to bring healthcare to everyone in the world.

Connect with us! Alumni, email Bo at elizabethbodunn@gmail.com. Current or prospective volunteers, email us connect@watsi.org.

All patients Watsi Volunteers has funded

Mu

Mu is a 17-year-old boy who lives with his sister in Mae Sot, Thailand. Before that, he lived with his parents, one older sister, two younger brothers and one younger sister in a refugee camp. His sister works at a non-governmental organisation helping others in need. Around mid-August, Mu woke up one morning with pain in his left knee. At first he thought that the pain would go away on its own and that it was nothing serious. However, when the pain remained a few days later, he told his sister about it. His sister bought him a type of Burmese pain reliever balm to apply on his knee. He applied the balm for a week, but he did not feel any better. When he and his sister noticed that his left knee had become slightly swollen his sister called their father. Mu’s father told them that it could be an ulcer and suggested that they go to a hospital or buy him pain medication to reduce swelling. His sister bought the medication their father had suggested at a pharmacy, and Mu took it for a week. However, he did not feel better, and the swelling did not decrease. Mu was able to have an MRI at Chiang Mai Hospital and now the doctor recommends he undergo surgery to remove a tumor on his left knee. Mu sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund and is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on December 17th. He is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care which will enable him to get off of using crutches and back to feeling well again. Mu said, "After I heard from the doctor that my leg does not need to be amputated, I feel so happy."

81% funded

81%funded
$1,217raised
$283to go
Clement

Clement is a small-scale farmer from Kenya. He was born and raised in a small village called Bugar where most of the people living in the area are farmers or find other casual jobs. He is married and has six children: two girls, and four boys. He did not attend school and communicates only in his mother tongue, called Keiyo. His family lives in a small mud house with a thatched roof and grows their food from their small farm, which mostly consists of maize and beans. Last week, Clement sustained a severe injury on his right leg after he was involved in a road traffic accident while going to the market. He was a passenger on a motorcycle that lost control and fell into a ditch leaving him and the rider with severe injuries. They were rushed to a nearby hospital where they received first aid and were later referred to our medical partner's care center for treatment. An X-ray revealed an open right tibia fibula fracture. Quickly Clement was rushed to the operating theatre for surgical debridement of wounds and casting. He was admitted to the hospital and is awaiting fracture surgery. He is unable to walk and is in great pain. Clement likes spending his days on his farm and as the breadwinner of the family, he's now feeling distressed because he can’t provide for them due to his condition. He is worried about the obstacles his family would face if his leg is not treated, having also been diagnosed with arthritis. The family doesn’t have funds to pay for his surgery and he's appealing for support. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 6th, Clement will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will reduce his pain and help him walk easily again. After complete recovery, he will be able to resume his work and support his family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund his treatment to help him heal. Clement says, “I want to be pain-free and healthy. I hope to be happy again and have a good life. My family needs me the most.”

73% funded

73%funded
$841raised
$304to go
Myo

Myo is 40-years-old and lives with his two sisters, two nephews, and two nieces in a village in Burma. He was a fisherman but stopped working when he started to experience problems on his left foot. As a result, his sisters support their household. One year ago, Myo noticed that his left big toe was itchy and swollen after he came home from fishing. Soon enough, it developed into an ulcer. Without enough money to go to a clinic or a hospital, he used traditional medicine and bought pain medicine to clean the infection. However, each time Myo would clean the ulcer, it would heal but returning a month later. Four months after he first developed the ulcer, the recurrent ulcer worsened until he could no longer walk without support from his sister. Eventually, he saved enough funds to visit a health clinic. When the ulcer still did not heal, he went to a second clinic and was referred to our medical partner's care center, Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH). At MCLH, the doctor tried to first clean and treat the infection. When that did not work, the doctor told him that they would have to amputate his left big toe and referred Myo to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) for assistance accessing treatment. On January 13th, Myo will undergo treatment to amputate his left big toe so that his infection can finally be treated and not spread to other parts of his body. For the treatment, BCMF is requesting $1,500 to help cover the costs. Hopefully, he will be able to return to fishing and other activities he previously enjoyed soon. Myo is hopeful that things will be better after surgery and shared, "When I recover, I will find work and support my sisters’ families.”

75% funded

75%funded
$1,126raised
$374to go
Mishel

Mishel is a new baby and the youngest in her family of three children. She is less than a week old. Her family was referred to our medical partner from western Kenya where she was born. Her mother is dedicated full time to raising their kids and taking care of the family and her father is the sole breadwinner who works whenever he can find jobs at construction sites. Their family has a small farm where they tend food crops for home use. They depend on the produce from the farm and the income from her father’s work for survival. They don’t have medical insurance coverage and need support for an urgent procedure for Mishel. Mishel is only four days old and delicately sleeps in her mother’s hands while talking with our local Watsi representative. Mishel was born with spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Mishel is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. She was immediately referred to BethanyKids Hospital for review and possible treatment. She is currently scheduled for surgery to avert the risks she faces without treatment. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,151 to cover the cost of Mishel's spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 19th. This procedure will hopefully spare Mishel from the risks associated with her condition, instead allowing her to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Mishel mother says, “Look at the peaceful beauty sleeping, she deserves to grow up as healthy baby.”

54% funded

54%funded
$625raised
$526to go
Jackson

Jackson is a 48-year-old married man and the father of three children. His oldest child is in high school and his youngest has not yet joined school. Jackson works as a welder, but he shared that work is hard to come by. His wife works as a teacher in a small private school. On Monday, December 20th, Jackson was riding as a passenger on his friend's motorbike when they were in an accident. They were going to plant some tomatoes on a farm they both owned. They arrived safely and went ahead to plant the tomatoes. When they were done, they decided to go back home and took off on Monday evening. Along the way, they were involved in an accident. Jackson was badly injured and rushed to the emergency room. Later, he was evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon where he was told he had a fractured femur and surgery is recommended. Jackson is bedridden and in pain, and he worries that without treatment, he might not be able to walk again. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help. On December 23rd, Jackson will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After a successful surgery, he will be able to move around easily and resume his work to provide for his family. Now, Jackson needs help raising $1,500 to fund his procedure and care. Jackson shared, "it is very hard to comprehend what happened and how I’m going to clear the hospital bill but despite the situation I’m in right now, I’m very happy that I’m receiving treatment."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded