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Darout is a moto driver from Cambodia who needs $230 to fund elbow fracture repair surgery.

Darout
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  • $36 raised, $194 to go
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$194
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September 7, 2020

Darout is a 30-year-old moto driver from Cambodia. He has been married for five years and has one son and one daughter. Darout’s wife works in a local factory.

Last year, Darout collided with a truck while driving his motorcycle. The incident caused a fracture of his right elbow. After the accident, his family took him to Vietnam where screws were put in his elbow. Now, the screws are exposed, there is pus, and he can not extend his arm.

Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, can help. On September 7th, Darout will undergo a hardware removal procedure, which will cost $230. This procedure will remove the screws and a wound culture will be taken to check for infection. Once healed, he will finally be able to use his arm again.

Darout says, “I hope after the screws are removed my elbow gets better and I don’t have this pus or discharge anymore.”

Darout is a 30-year-old moto driver from Cambodia. He has been married for five years and has one son and one daughter. Darout's wife works ...

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Darout's Timeline

  • September 7, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Darout was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • September 07, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Darout received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 08, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Darout's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 26, 2020
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Darout's treatment update from Children's Surgical Centre.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Darout is currently raising funds for his treatment.

Funded by 2 donors

Funded by 2 donors

Treatment
ORIF / Fracture
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $230 for Darout's treatment
Hospital Fees
$35
Medical Staff
$147
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients who experience painful fractures or recurrent dislocations need ORIF (open reduction internal fixation) surgeries to heal the injuries. Most often, these fractures and dislocations result from traffic accidents. ORIF procedures require the insertion of metal plates, screws, or rods to stabilize the bones while they heal. Bowleg procedures also require the insertion of hardware, such as staples, in order to realign the legs. Bowleg can be caused both by genetics and by vitamin and mineral deficiencies. However, surgeons may decide to remove the hardware. The most common reason for hardware removal is pain or loss of mobility and range of motion around the ORIF site. Other reasons include infection, nerve damage, incomplete healing of the bone, or an allergy to the implant.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Living with hardware fixation causes pain, limits function, and can interfere with daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

There is a high rate of traffic accidents in Cambodia because of a lack of helmet usage and weak enforcement of traffic laws. These accidents cause many of the fractures and bone dislocations that our medical partner sees.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

During an ORIF procedure, the deformed or broken bone is correctly aligned into its normal position. Steel rods, screws, or plates are used to keep the bone fracture stable and allow it to heal. Sometimes, bone grafting is needed to promote healing. During hardware removal, surgeons use the previous incisions to find and remove the hardware. In some cases, additional incisions are made to safely perform the operation.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Patients will experience restored function and mobility. They will also have reduced pain. Patients can be independent again and return to work, school, and family life.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This surgery is low-risk and extremely effective.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Rural Cambodians often self-medicate or seek treatment from traditional healers because they cannot afford treatment at local clinics or hospitals. Many patients are referred to CSC by word of mouth.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There is no alternative to this treatment.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Naw Ree

Naw Ree is a 49-year-old woman from Thailand. Naw Ree has lived by herself in a refugee camp in northern Thailand since 2009. As a camp resident, Naw Ree receives 243 baht (approx. $8 USD) each month from an organization that supports refugee camp residents. She also works as a maternal and child health worker, receiving 900 baht (approx. $30 USD) per month. Naw Ree raises chickens and grows vegetables. Despite receiving free health care services in the camp, Naw Ree is struggling to make ends meet. On December 16th, 2020, Naw Ree went to see a woman who had recently given birth, to remind her about vaccinating her baby on time. After sitting and talking to the woman in her home, Naw Ree stood up to leave but felt light headed and fell. She put out her left hand to stop her fall, and hurt her left arm. She went to the hospital in the camp, run by Malteser International [MI] Thailand, and received pain medication and her arm was put into a sling. The next day, she was referred to Mae Seriang General Hospital for further treatment. At the hospital she received x-rays and the doctor told her that she had fractured one of the bones in her left forearm. She was then referred to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment, but her transfer was delayed for over two weeks due to an outbreak in COVID-19 cases in northern Thailand. Since Naw Ree lives by herself, she has to cook, wash her clothes, and feed her chickens without anyone's help, a difficult feat with her broken arm. Currently, she is in pain but has no fever. She can only fall asleep if she takes pain medication. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Naw Ree will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for January 6th and will cost $1,500. After surgery, Naw Ree will no longer be in pain. She will be able to go back to work as a health worker and she will be able to complete her household chores without pain or discomfort. Naw Ree shared, "My greatest wish is that I recover and that I may be able to use my left arm again."

73% funded

73%funded
$1,107raised
$393to go
Rebecca

Rebecca is a 1-year-old girl from Tanzania. She is the last born in a family of two children and has started to grow into a strong and beautiful girl. Both of her parents depend on small scale farming to support their family. Rebecca was initially brought to the hospital by her parents seeking treatment to help correct her spina bifida condition. Spina bifida is a birth defect that occurs when the spine and spinal cord fail to form properly. This puts a child in danger of limb paralyses or death in case of a severe infection. At the time, Rebecca's parents could not afford the proposed surgery. Luckily, one of their friends advised them to seek help at our medical partner's care center, ALMC Plaster House. Through Watsi funding, Rebecca’s life was saved and she has been growing well since then. However, a few weeks ago, Rebecca's mother noticed her daughter's head was increasing in size at a very fast rate and she was complaining of headaches. Her parents had worked hard to save some money and got a health insurance card for their baby, so they decided to take her to the hospital to seek treatment. There, Rebecca was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. She needs to have an ETV surgery that will help relieve her of the pressure build-up, which would otherwise lead to brain damage. Unfortunately, their insurance has not matured enough to cover this kind of major surgery, so Rebecca's parents are appealing for financial support to help her. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Rebecca that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 25th and will drain the excess fluid from Rebecca's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Rebecca will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Rebecca’s mother shared, “My daughter’s head is increasing in size and it is making her sick. She needs surgery but the insurance we got for her cannot cover the cost. Please help once more if it is possible because we don’t know where to run to for help besides all of you.”

9% funded

9%funded
$120raised
$1,180to go
Ezra

Ezra is a 28-year-old man from Kabomo Village, Kenya. He works as a labourer in his village. Ezra is a very talkative and energetic person. Earlier in October, Ezra fell into a ditch and sustained a severe fracture on his right lower leg. He could not lift his leg and was in great pain. Ezra was taken to the nearest health centre, where a cast was placed and he was referred to our medical partner's facility for orthopedic review. On arrival at Kapsowar Hospital, Ezra was reviewed and sent for an x-ray which revealed a right tibia plateau fracture that required surgery. However, he did not have money to pay the necessary deposit to have the surgery. Because he was in pain and his leg was swelling abnormally, Ezra was admitted to elevate his limb and avoid any complications that may arise due to his fracture. Twelve days later, Ezra has been deemed fit for surgery, but the family has not raised the required amount to proceed for surgery. Due to his injury, Ezra is not able to continue working to raise money for his procedure. He dropped out of school in 8th grade due to his family's financial struggles, and as such works many causal jobs to meet his daily needs. Ezra is a young, hardworking man and is very optimistic of a better future. So far, he has raised 20,000 Kenyan shillings, and is appealing for financial support for his surgery so that he can have a good outcome. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On October 23rd, Ezra will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will allow Ezra to ambulate with ease and reduce chances of future complications. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,016 to fund his procedure. Ezra shared, “It hasn't been easy for me since I fractured my leg. This situation has weighed heavily on me because there’s no one to help me out. My hope is to receive treatment, get out of the hospital bed and walk again.”

82% funded

82%funded
$834raised
$182to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Naw Ree

Naw Ree is a 49-year-old woman from Thailand. Naw Ree has lived by herself in a refugee camp in northern Thailand since 2009. As a camp resident, Naw Ree receives 243 baht (approx. $8 USD) each month from an organization that supports refugee camp residents. She also works as a maternal and child health worker, receiving 900 baht (approx. $30 USD) per month. Naw Ree raises chickens and grows vegetables. Despite receiving free health care services in the camp, Naw Ree is struggling to make ends meet. On December 16th, 2020, Naw Ree went to see a woman who had recently given birth, to remind her about vaccinating her baby on time. After sitting and talking to the woman in her home, Naw Ree stood up to leave but felt light headed and fell. She put out her left hand to stop her fall, and hurt her left arm. She went to the hospital in the camp, run by Malteser International [MI] Thailand, and received pain medication and her arm was put into a sling. The next day, she was referred to Mae Seriang General Hospital for further treatment. At the hospital she received x-rays and the doctor told her that she had fractured one of the bones in her left forearm. She was then referred to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment, but her transfer was delayed for over two weeks due to an outbreak in COVID-19 cases in northern Thailand. Since Naw Ree lives by herself, she has to cook, wash her clothes, and feed her chickens without anyone's help, a difficult feat with her broken arm. Currently, she is in pain but has no fever. She can only fall asleep if she takes pain medication. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Naw Ree will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for January 6th and will cost $1,500. After surgery, Naw Ree will no longer be in pain. She will be able to go back to work as a health worker and she will be able to complete her household chores without pain or discomfort. Naw Ree shared, "My greatest wish is that I recover and that I may be able to use my left arm again."

73% funded

73%funded
$1,107raised
$393to go