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Alexmar from Venezuela raised $1,500 to fund clubfoot repair surgery.

Alexmar
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Alexmar's treatment was fully funded on May 19, 2021.

Photo of Alexmar post-operation

July 29, 2021

Alexmar underwent clubfoot repair surgery.

Alexmar had her surgery and everything went perfectly. Her pre-surgery casting was a success at helping reposition her right foot, so her doctor decided that it wasn’t necessary to perform surgery on both feet, only her left foot. Alexmar also received surgery for her hand which was also impacted by a birth condition and is recovering well. The little girl has a bright future ahead!

Alexmar’s mother shared a message with us, “I wanted to thank you because thanks to you my daughter will walk. Thanks to you, my dream has come true. Thanks to you, I’m seeing my daughter completely healthy. Bless you.”

Alexmar had her surgery and everything went perfectly. Her pre-surgery casting was a success at helping reposition her right foot, so her do...

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May 13, 2021

Alexmar is 20-month-old baby girl and already has a curious personality! She is the youngest of three children. Due to the economic and political situation in Venezuela, her family moved to Colombia seeking better opportunities. She loves to play with her mom and siblings, and her mom dreams of seeing her walk and run as she grows up.

Alexmar has clubfoot of both feet. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes.

Fortunately, Alexmar’s family traveled to visit our medical partner, Clínica Noel, where surgeons will perform bilateral clubfoot repair surgery on June 15th. Now, Clínica Noel is requesting $1,500 to fund Alexmar’s surgery. After treatment, she will be able to walk, run, and play with friends.

Her mother shared, “when I saw her born like this I felt really sad, I entered a postpartum depression. Somehow, knowing that she will be able to walk and grab stuff and that really kind people are going to help me pay for the treatment reaffirms my faith in God.”

Alexmar is 20-month-old baby girl and already has a curious personality! She is the youngest of three children. Due to the economic and poli...

Read more

Alexmar's Timeline

  • May 13, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Alexmar was submitted by Sofía Gaviria Miranda, Head of Donations at Clínica Noel.

  • May 19, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Alexmar's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • May 19, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Alexmar's treatment was fully funded.

  • July 13, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Alexmar received treatment at Clínica Noel in Colombia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • July 29, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    We received an update on Alexmar. Read the update.

Funded by 1 donor

Funded by 1 donor

Treatment
Clubfoot Bilateral
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,893 for Alexmar's treatment
Subsidies fund $393 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,017
Medical Staff
$756
Medication
$120
Supplies
$0
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients diagnosed with clubfoot, have one or both feet turned inward, which might lead to complex extremity malformations, walking limitations, tight heel cord, and pain during walking.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients diagnosed with clubfoot, might experience pain while walking or not be able to walk, might not be able to wear shoes, and are often at risk of bullying at school. If the condition is not treated, the patient might be in constant pain and risk development of arthritis.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Many patients in Colombia live in rural areas, their families don’t have health insurance coverage nor money to pay for the treatment, they don’t have access to specialized centers, and have to travel long distances, which leads families to abandon the treatments.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

When patients visit a doctor, they are referred to a pediatric orthopedist, who starts the treatment with a series of casts which are changed weekly. The team them performs a surgery when early diagnosed. In case the patient is not treated opportunely, or treatment is abandoned, reconstructive surgery might be needed.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

When a patient gets treatment, an anatomic and functional correction of the extremity is performed. A patient will be able to wear shoes and to walk without pain. There’s also an esthetic improvement which leads to higher self-esteem and reduces the risk of psychological impact.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

There’s a chance this treatment leaves residual malformations, scars, or relapses of the treatment. As in any surgery, there is a risk of bleeding and infection.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

In the country, it’s hard to have access to good health insurance coverage, is rare that patients are driven to a specialized institution, and even when they are, families often don’t have enough money to pay for the treatment.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Reconstructive surgery with highly complex osteotomies and tendon transfers.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Emmanuel

Emmanuel is a 17-year-old student from Haiti who hopes to become a doctor. He lives with his aunt and uncle in a neighborhood of Port-au-Prince so that he can more easily attend school, as his parents live in the countryside. Emmanuel has a cardiac condition called rheumatic mitral regurgitation, which means one of his heart valves was severely damaged from an infection he experienced in early childhood. In 2017, Emmanuel underwent heart surgery to repair his existing valve. This surgery stabilized his heart for several years, but the valve remains unable to pump blood adequately throughout his body. Emmanuel needs to undergo a second surgery to replace the valve with a prosthetic heart valve. Emmanuel will fly to the Dominican Republic to receive treatment, as this surgery is unavailable in Haiti. On November 10th, he will undergo cardiac surgery, during which surgeons will remove the damaged heart valve and implant a replacement valve. An organization called Mitral Foundation is contributing $8,000 to pay for help pay for surgery. Emmanuel's family also needs help to fund the costs of surgery prep. The $1,500 bill covers labs, medicines, and check-up and follow-up appointments. It also supports passport obtainment and the social workers from our medical partner, Haiti Cardiac Alliance, who will accompany Emmanuel's family overseas. Emmanuel shared, "I am looking forward to growing stronger and having much more energy after my surgery!"

77% funded

77%funded
$1,162raised
$338to go
William

William is a small-scale farmer from Kenya. He is a married man with twelve children. Some of his oldest children are married while others are still in school. William and his family live in a semi-permanent house. He has been a long-term potato farmer who has been growing them mainly for sale. His family has worked on their farm and it has contributed a lot to their income. Through the limited income William makes, he has been able to provide for his children's basic needs. William has medical insurance that he has been using throughout all his visits for inpatient and outpatient services for his medical procedures. In May 2019, when William was walking along the road, he was hit by a motorbike and he fell down, thus injuring his lower limb. Immediately, he was taken to a facility where he was admitted and surgery was done.  All was well up to last year when he started feeling unwell and decided to visit our partner's hospital. He presented with a lot of pain, he had a wound that was discharging pus, and his affected limb was swollen. An x-ray was recommended and it found that he had a non-union on his fractured bone and he had to be admitted for hardware removal, as it was already infected. He went to the operating theater for infected hardware removal and antibiotic nailing was done in order to treat his infection.  Since the nail was not stable, a patella tendon-bearing cast was applied in order to immobilize his non-united fracture. He has been in and out of the hospital for frequent check-ups, change of dressing, and casts. The wound has not improved and at some time after the antibiotic nailing, he went to the operating room for debridement and vacuum-assisted closure of the wound to help in healing and daily dressing change has been done in a health facility near his home. He also suffered eye problems in between and can barely see at the moment. On Monday when he came for review, his wound was not well and had a foul smell. His hardware needs to be removed, the non-union has to be taken down and an ORIF procedure will be done for stability. He was prepared for admission, but then it was realized that he had exhausted his inpatient insurance limit. In order to save his leg, it is vital to perform the surgery immediately. William has no alternative way of paying for his procedure, which is very complex. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 7th, William will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. When treated, William will be able to walk normally and he will continue with farming to provide for his family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1145 to fund this medical care. William says, "Spending most of the time in the hospital has been quite challenging. I cannot work or supervise my work as I did before because of my fractured limb. I am really looking forward to getting better in order to stabilize my family again. Please help me."

56% funded

56%funded
$642raised
$503to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Emmanuel

Emmanuel is a 17-year-old student from Haiti who hopes to become a doctor. He lives with his aunt and uncle in a neighborhood of Port-au-Prince so that he can more easily attend school, as his parents live in the countryside. Emmanuel has a cardiac condition called rheumatic mitral regurgitation, which means one of his heart valves was severely damaged from an infection he experienced in early childhood. In 2017, Emmanuel underwent heart surgery to repair his existing valve. This surgery stabilized his heart for several years, but the valve remains unable to pump blood adequately throughout his body. Emmanuel needs to undergo a second surgery to replace the valve with a prosthetic heart valve. Emmanuel will fly to the Dominican Republic to receive treatment, as this surgery is unavailable in Haiti. On November 10th, he will undergo cardiac surgery, during which surgeons will remove the damaged heart valve and implant a replacement valve. An organization called Mitral Foundation is contributing $8,000 to pay for help pay for surgery. Emmanuel's family also needs help to fund the costs of surgery prep. The $1,500 bill covers labs, medicines, and check-up and follow-up appointments. It also supports passport obtainment and the social workers from our medical partner, Haiti Cardiac Alliance, who will accompany Emmanuel's family overseas. Emmanuel shared, "I am looking forward to growing stronger and having much more energy after my surgery!"

77% funded

77%funded
$1,162raised
$338to go