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Success! Atugonza from Uganda raised $249 to fund hernia repair surgery.

Atugonza
100%
  • $249 raised, $0 to go
$249
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Atugonza's treatment was fully funded on October 5, 2018.

Photo of Atugonza post-operation

September 26, 2018

Atugonza underwent hernia repair surgery.

Her hernia treatment was successful. She will no longer experience pain and will have improved quality of life. She is no longer at risk of the hernia twisting or blocking.

Her mother says, “May the Almighty God double their blessings. I have nothing to give in return. After recovery my daughter will resume with her studies. God bless you.”

Her hernia treatment was successful. She will no longer experience pain and will have improved quality of life. She is no longer at risk of ...

Read more
August 31, 2018

Atugonza is a young student from Uganda. She is the second born in a family of four children. She is studying hard because she wants to become a nurse in the future.

For two years, Atugonza has had an umbilical hernia. This hernia is causing her pain and discomfort and if not treated, she may suffer intestinal tissue damage. Fortunately, on September 12, she will undergo hernia repair surgery at our medical partner’s care center.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $249 to fund Atugonza’s surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably and confidently.

Her mother says, “After the surgery of my daughter I will be happy and she will resume with her studies without anything disturbing her.”

Atugonza is a young student from Uganda. She is the second born in a family of four children. She is studying hard because she wants to beco...

Read more

Atugonza's Timeline

  • August 31, 2018
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Atugonza was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • September 06, 2018
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Atugonza's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 12, 2018
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Atugonza received treatment at Holy Family Virika Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 26, 2018
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Atugonza's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • October 05, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Atugonza's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 1 donor

Funded by 1 donor

Treatment
Hernia Repair
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $249 for Atugonza's treatment
Hospital Fees
$181
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$58
Supplies
$0
Labs
$10
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A hernia occurs when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the lower abdominal wall, usually for one of two reasons. The first is a congenital abnormality in which the tissues did not close. The second is excessive stress in an adult, often due to heavy physical labor or pregnancy. Patients experience a bulge or lump in the affected area. The hernia may cause the patient to feel pain, discomfort, weakness, pressure, and sensations of heaviness or aching. These symptoms are often exacerbated when the patient coughs, bends over, or lifts heavy objects. In some cases, hernias have no symptoms and are only detected during routine medical exams.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients with uncomplicated hernias may experience only annoyance or discomfort. As the hernia opening expands, the discomfort will increase. Small openings are more likely to trap the intestine, potentially leading to intestinal damage or death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hernias are common in Africa. People often do very hard physical labor and lift heavy objects. Women tend to have more children than those in the United States. It is possible that some hernias have infectious or genetic causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts for three to eight hours, depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient will stay in the hospital anywhere from two days to eight weeks, again depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment is curative. The chance of intestinal strangulation or bowel obstruction reduces significantly.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Hernia repair is not a risky procedure, and it comes with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many patients will ignore a hernia until it becomes uncomfortable and seek care at that time. Some people will wear tighter pants or a tight band around the waist to prevent the intestine from protruding.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If the hernia is not “stuck,” patients tend to ignore it and adapt to living with it. However, this could lead to future complications.

Meet another patient you can support

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Aung

Aung is a 15-year-old novice monk from Burma. He stays in the monastery in his village of Hpa-An. His parents own a piece of land where his father and oldest brother grow vegetables and fruits to sell. His family also grows vegetables for their own consumption. Two months ago, Aung developed headaches, and his head increased in size, especially the right side of his head. At that time, his father bought medication from the pharmacy to reduce his headaches. He took it for two days but did not feel better. Later on, his father took him to Hpa-An Hospital where he received a blood test and an x-ray. The doctor told his father to take him to Yangon but his father instead brought him to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Mae Sot, Thailand. On February 25th, Aung arrived at MTC and he was referred to Watsi Medical Partner's Mae Sot Hospital the next day. At MSH, the doctor has recommended a CT scan and also told Aung's father that Aung needs to replace the shunt he received in his head in 2016 that has helped treat his hydrocephalus condition; unfortunately, the shunt is now blocked. The family is hopeful that Watsi supporters may be able to support a shunt procedure as well. Currently, Aung suffers from headaches and the area where he had the shunt inserted into his head is slowly increasing in size. The area of his head that has increased in size is sensitive and he is not able to sleep on his right side. Doctors want Aung to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors further diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Aung's CT scan and care, scheduled for February 27th. Aung said, "When I lie down and sleep, I can sleep only on one side because the growth hurts if I lay on it." He is hoping to feel better with treatment.

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$414to go
Philemon

Philemon is a farmer from Kenya. Philemon is a 22 year old father of one and himself is the first born child of a family of four. Being the first born child in a less fortunate family, Philemon’s roles were defined so fast that he dropped out of school so that his younger siblings could get a chance to proceed with their studies. He opted to do farming with his dad so that they can improve their humble background. Philemon is hardworking and energetic man who is depended by the family for its daily needs. Philemon was well until 9th August when he fell from a tree and sustained injury to his left leg and was diagnosed with an open proximal tibia fracture. Philemon was brought to our hospital and was received by our doctors. He underwent his first surgery to clean and close his wounds. He was then admitted to wait for ORIF surgery. He is unable to stand with his left leg. He can only walk with the able of a walker or being wheeled on a wheel chair. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On August 15th, Philemon underwent a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. He will be able to walk normally after treatment. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $968 to fund this procedure. Philemon says, “I need to walk again, I don’t have a sustainable job to feed my parents and siblings. I also want to make sure that they finish school and get proper education."

77% funded

77%funded
$748raised
$220to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Aung

Aung is a 15-year-old novice monk from Burma. He stays in the monastery in his village of Hpa-An. His parents own a piece of land where his father and oldest brother grow vegetables and fruits to sell. His family also grows vegetables for their own consumption. Two months ago, Aung developed headaches, and his head increased in size, especially the right side of his head. At that time, his father bought medication from the pharmacy to reduce his headaches. He took it for two days but did not feel better. Later on, his father took him to Hpa-An Hospital where he received a blood test and an x-ray. The doctor told his father to take him to Yangon but his father instead brought him to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Mae Sot, Thailand. On February 25th, Aung arrived at MTC and he was referred to Watsi Medical Partner's Mae Sot Hospital the next day. At MSH, the doctor has recommended a CT scan and also told Aung's father that Aung needs to replace the shunt he received in his head in 2016 that has helped treat his hydrocephalus condition; unfortunately, the shunt is now blocked. The family is hopeful that Watsi supporters may be able to support a shunt procedure as well. Currently, Aung suffers from headaches and the area where he had the shunt inserted into his head is slowly increasing in size. The area of his head that has increased in size is sensitive and he is not able to sleep on his right side. Doctors want Aung to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors further diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Aung's CT scan and care, scheduled for February 27th. Aung said, "When I lie down and sleep, I can sleep only on one side because the growth hurts if I lay on it." He is hoping to feel better with treatment.

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$414to go