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Success! Emily from Uganda raised $187 to fund a mass removal.

Emily
100%
  • $187 raised, $0 to go
$187
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Emily's treatment was fully funded on May 10, 2020.

Photo of Emily post-operation

December 11, 2019

Emily underwent a mass removal.

Emily Tukasingura underwent successful excision treatment for a bilateral ganglionic cyst. She now feels much better, free from the pain and the disfigurement and feels she can now do her domestic works like washing and the farm activities.

Emily says, “my prayer will always be directed to you people because you have really saved my life of which I couldn’t believe. May you continue with the spirit. I will continue with cultivation activities.”

Emily Tukasingura underwent successful excision treatment for a bilateral ganglionic cyst. She now feels much better, free from the pain and...

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November 4, 2019

Emily is a peasant farmer from Uganda. Emily visited our hospital with complaints of a progressive swelling on her bilateral wrists which has been present for the past five years. The swelling has limited her ability to attend to her daily duties such as preparing meals and cultivation. She has never received medical care previously due to inability to pay. She heard of our funding program and visited the hospital. She was diagnosed with a bilateral ganglion cyst and surgery was recommended. If not treated, Emily is at risk of total discomfort and limited utility of her hands. Emily is the mother of three children who are all in school. She tends to her small farm with limited output and income. Her husband joins her in the farm and their efforts only yield income sufficient for just their basic needs. Emily appeals for financial assistance.

Emily traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On November 5th, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Emily needs help to raise $187 to fund this procedure.

Emily says, “I hope for a better treatment and relief of this condition after surgery and I continue doing farming for the survival of my family.”

Emily is a peasant farmer from Uganda. Emily visited our hospital with complaints of a progressive swelling on her bilateral wrists which ha...

Read more

Emily's Timeline

  • November 4, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Emily was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • November 6, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Emily received treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 19, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Emily's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 11, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Emily's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • May 10, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Emily's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 4 donors

Funded by 4 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $187 for Emily's treatment
Hospital Fees
$96
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$29
Supplies
$28
Labs
$34
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of accessibility to treatment facilities, some of the patients have lived with masses for a long time. Access to medical facilities is difficult for people living in remote parts of Uganda.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is usually admitted for three days. They undergo three- to five-hour surgery depending on the location of the mass and whether it's cancerous. After surgery, they are continuously monitored in the wards.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Yin

Yin is a 62-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, son in-law, and granddaughter in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. She is a homemaker, and she loves cooking and cleaning around her house. In her free time, Yin loves to play with her granddaughter. Her husband is retried, and her son in-law is unemployed. Yin’s family receives 800 baht (approx. 27 USD) on a cash card every month to purchase rations. This income is just enough for their daily needs, but they cannot afford to pay other costs like healthcare. Currently, Yin has limited vision and can only make out if it is dark or light outside with her right eye. The vision in Yin’s left eye is starting to blur, and she cannot see far with her left eye. She is worried that she will lose vision in both of her eyes. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Yin. On June 8th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Yin's natural lenses and replace them with an intraocular lens implant in each eye. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Yin shared, "Before my vision started to blur, I used to make and sell mohinga [a type of Burmese noodles]. With the money that I earned from selling mohinga, I was able to buy vegetables for my family. However, when the vision in my right eye vision became blurred, I could no longer make mohinga anymore. I hope that my vision will be restored after I complete my treatment.”

84% funded

84%funded
$1,270raised
$230to go
D

D is a 38-year-old man who lives by himself and used to wash cars in a mechanic's shop until his accident. Unfortunately, he had to quit his job because of his condition and he has had no income since. On April 2nd, his friends asked him to pick mangos. After climbing up the tree, the branch he was holding onto suddenly broke and he fell onto a rock. He broke his right lower leg in the fall. Unable to stand up by himself, his two friends supported him and arranged for his transportation to a local hospital. At the hospital, he received an x-ray and the doctor wrapped his lower leg in a bandage. He scheduled a follow-up appointment for the following week and went home. However, D did not go back to the hospital because he had no money. Two weeks later, he visited a local clinic because he was still in pain. He was referred to our medical partner's care center where an x-ray showed that he had broken both of the bones in his right lower leg and he was told that he would need surgery. Currently, he cannot walk and experiences pain in his lower right leg when he moves. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, D will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for May 23rd and will cost $1,500. This surgery will help D walk again and he will be able to find work after he has made a full recovery. D shared, "I lost my job after my leg was injured. I no longer have an income or a place to live. I do not have anyone I can depend on and I feel like I have no more hope living with this condition."

86% funded

86%funded
$1,297raised
$203to go
Tuhirweomugisha

Tuhirweomugisha is a farmer and a 45-year-old mother of 4 children. All of her children are in school and she is the only provider for the family after losing her husband in 2002. Tuhirweomugisha has been working primarily as a small scale farmer and also is weaving of local baskets and mats to earn extra income. 11 months ago, Tuhirweomugisha has been experiencing lower abdominal and back pain, poor appetite, along with other symptoms. She has been diagnosed with premalignant cervical lesion, which has the potential of turning into cancer if not treated. Tuhirweomugisha had initially gone to a hospital near her home where surgery recommended. However, the cost was very high and her only option was to sell her only piece of land, compromising her source of income which her children's futures depend on. Instead, Tuhirweomugisha turned to our medical partner's care center, Nyakibale Hospital. After review, she was diagnosed with the premalignant lesion and requires a total abdominal hysterectomy to remove her uterus in order to suppress chances of the lesion turning cancerous and affecting her quality of life. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $219 to fund Tuhirweomugisha's surgery. On June 22nd, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Tuhirweomugisha will be able to resume her daily activities with ease. Tuhirweomugisha hopes to return to her responsibilities soon, “I have failed to raise money for my hospital bill on my own and I hope that with your support, I will be able to regain my health and continue working hard through farming to provide for my children.”

22% funded

22%funded
$50raised
$169to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Yin

Yin is a 62-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, son in-law, and granddaughter in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. She is a homemaker, and she loves cooking and cleaning around her house. In her free time, Yin loves to play with her granddaughter. Her husband is retried, and her son in-law is unemployed. Yin’s family receives 800 baht (approx. 27 USD) on a cash card every month to purchase rations. This income is just enough for their daily needs, but they cannot afford to pay other costs like healthcare. Currently, Yin has limited vision and can only make out if it is dark or light outside with her right eye. The vision in Yin’s left eye is starting to blur, and she cannot see far with her left eye. She is worried that she will lose vision in both of her eyes. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Yin. On June 8th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Yin's natural lenses and replace them with an intraocular lens implant in each eye. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Yin shared, "Before my vision started to blur, I used to make and sell mohinga [a type of Burmese noodles]. With the money that I earned from selling mohinga, I was able to buy vegetables for my family. However, when the vision in my right eye vision became blurred, I could no longer make mohinga anymore. I hope that my vision will be restored after I complete my treatment.”

84% funded

84%funded
$1,270raised
$230to go