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Success! Abin from Uganda raised $188 to fund cyst removal surgery so he can grow up healthy.

Abin
100%
  • $188 raised, $0 to go
$188
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Abin's treatment was fully funded on December 29, 2022.

Photo of Abin post-operation

January 4, 2023

Abin underwent cyst removal surgery so he can grow up healthy.

Abin successfully received an excision treatment after being indicated with an epidermal cyst. His surgery went on as planned. He was able to recover from anesthesia and started postoperative treatment to ensure he fully heals. By late evening of that same day of surgery he was able to walk, reporting no pain and was in good health. With a complete recovery, he will be able to continue studying in good health.

Abin’s mother said, “I am so privileged and happy to see my son once again happy with a smile on his face after a long time. I am sure he will get much better with time and may God bless you abundantly for whatever you’ve done for me.”

Abin successfully received an excision treatment after being indicated with an epidermal cyst. His surgery went on as planned. He was able t...

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September 6, 2022

Abin is a 14-year-old boy and the third born in a family of four children. Abin has one brother and two sisters, all of them are in school. Abin is a quiet boy, letting his mother answer questions for him. Abin’s family lives in a two-roomed mud-built house. His parents work as farmers and their income is just enough to meet the family’s basic needs.

One month ago, Abin noticed a swelling. This swelling is painful, causing discomfort while Abin sleeps or walks. Abin was taken to our medical partner’s care center in Nyakibale Hospital and was diagnosed with a cyst that needs to be surgically removed. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Abin’s family raise $188 so can he can receive this surgery on September 6th.

Abin’s mother says, “I hope when my son gets treated, he will be out of pain and resume his day-to-day life with ease.”

Abin is a 14-year-old boy and the third born in a family of four children. Abin has one brother and two sisters, all of them are in school. ...

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Abin's Timeline

  • September 5, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Abin received treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 6, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Abin was submitted by Edward Mugane, Impact Assessment Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • September 9, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Abin's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 29, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Abin's treatment was fully funded.

  • January 4, 2023
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Abin's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 4 donors

Funded by 4 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision (Major)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $188 for Abin's treatment
Hospital Fees
$43
Medical Staff
$32
Medication
$12
Supplies
$45
Labs
$30
Other
$26
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, even death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (including certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of accessibility to treatment facilities, some of the patients have lived with masses for a long time. Access to medical facilities is difficult for people living in remote parts of Uganda.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is usually admitted to the hospital for three days. For major masses, the patient is operated under general anaesthesia and depending on the mass location and whether it is malignant or not, the surgery is approximately 3-5 hours long. After surgery, patients are continuously monitored in the hospital ward to ensure proper healing.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not classified as highly risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this surgical procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery in this region. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but monitoring the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Ashin Mala

Ashin Mala is a 30-year-old monk who lives in a monastery in Karen State, Burma. He became a monk a year ago. As a monk, Ashin usually doesn’t have the right to save money and keep cash. But sometimes, worshippers donate some money, and he keeps it to use just in case. The monastery usually provides him two meals a day donated by the Buddhist followers. In October, one day, he visited a house of a member of ethnic armed group in the village. A kid was playing with a pistol and accidentally shot the gun in the wall. Unfortunately, the bullet ricocheted and hit his left eye. The villagers sent Ashin Mala to Myawaddy General Hospital immediately. At the hospital, an X-ray was done and showed that a piece of the bullet had entered below his right eyeball. The doctors stitched the gunshot wound and gave some medications. There was no ophthalmologist at hospital. Ashin visited the hospital regularly and got wound dressing as well as medication to relieve pain. But the pain didn’t go away. He has lost sight in his left eye. Pain and itchiness, and sometimes a burning sensation, is present in the right eye and surrounding area. Hot tears are coming out from both eyes during blinking occasionally whenever he reads book for a long time. Due to the lack of ophthalmologist, he was provided only with medications and eyedrops. Now doctors want Ashin Mala to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Ashin Mala's CT scan and care, scheduled for December 9th. Ashin Mala said, "I don’t want to blame anyone. It is my destiny. I am not sure my condition can be treated or not. But I am so happy to be treated here because I think I can have better health care here than in Burma. I don’t expect complete recovery, but it will be great if I can see with both eyes. In the future, I want to learn more about Dhamma and hope to attend Buddha University in the future."

31% funded

31%funded
$130raised
$284to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Ashin Mala

Ashin Mala is a 30-year-old monk who lives in a monastery in Karen State, Burma. He became a monk a year ago. As a monk, Ashin usually doesn’t have the right to save money and keep cash. But sometimes, worshippers donate some money, and he keeps it to use just in case. The monastery usually provides him two meals a day donated by the Buddhist followers. In October, one day, he visited a house of a member of ethnic armed group in the village. A kid was playing with a pistol and accidentally shot the gun in the wall. Unfortunately, the bullet ricocheted and hit his left eye. The villagers sent Ashin Mala to Myawaddy General Hospital immediately. At the hospital, an X-ray was done and showed that a piece of the bullet had entered below his right eyeball. The doctors stitched the gunshot wound and gave some medications. There was no ophthalmologist at hospital. Ashin visited the hospital regularly and got wound dressing as well as medication to relieve pain. But the pain didn’t go away. He has lost sight in his left eye. Pain and itchiness, and sometimes a burning sensation, is present in the right eye and surrounding area. Hot tears are coming out from both eyes during blinking occasionally whenever he reads book for a long time. Due to the lack of ophthalmologist, he was provided only with medications and eyedrops. Now doctors want Ashin Mala to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Ashin Mala's CT scan and care, scheduled for December 9th. Ashin Mala said, "I don’t want to blame anyone. It is my destiny. I am not sure my condition can be treated or not. But I am so happy to be treated here because I think I can have better health care here than in Burma. I don’t expect complete recovery, but it will be great if I can see with both eyes. In the future, I want to learn more about Dhamma and hope to attend Buddha University in the future."

31% funded

31%funded
$130raised
$284to go