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Success! James from Kenya raised $423 to fund testicular surgery.

James
100%
  • $423 raised, $0 to go
$423
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
James's treatment was fully funded on June 26, 2020.

Photo of James post-operation

February 21, 2020

James underwent testicular surgery.

James had successful surgery to repair the hydrocele defect. This has minimized the risk of suffering an inguinal hernia or a testicular torsion.

“Thank you so much for helping me. I will give back someday to make someone feel as loved as you did,” says James’ mother.

James had successful surgery to repair the hydrocele defect. This has minimized the risk of suffering an inguinal hernia or a testicular tor...

Read more
December 10, 2019

James is a young student from Kenya. He is the lastborn of 9 children and is currently in the 6th grade. His father suffered from a stroke and is being looked after by his mother. James’ sister and mother sell food at a market along a busy road near their place of residence. They are the sole providers for the family. With an income that barely sustains the needs of the big family, they are not in a position to raise a dime towards the needed surgical care.

One year ago, James found out he has a hydrocele. The hydrocele causes him pain and discomfort. Fortunately, on December 13th, he will undergo repair surgery at our medical partner’s care center.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $423 to fund James’s surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably.

“I would like to be an engineer when I grow up,” says James.

James is a young student from Kenya. He is the lastborn of 9 children and is currently in the 6th grade. His father suffered from a stroke a...

Read more

James's Timeline

  • December 10, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    James was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Kenya.

  • December 11, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    James's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 13, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    James received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 21, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    James's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • June 26, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    James's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 6 donors

Funded by 6 donors

Treatment
Hernia / Hydrocele Single
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $423 for James's treatment
Hospital Fees
$417
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$2
Supplies
$0
Labs
$4
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A hernia occurs when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the lower abdominal wall, usually for one of two reasons. The first is a congenital abnormality in which the tissues did not close. The second is excessive stress in an adult, often due to heavy physical labor or pregnancy. Patients experience a bulge or lump in the affected area. The hernia may cause the patient to feel pain, discomfort, weakness, pressure, and sensations of heaviness or aching. These symptoms are often exacerbated when the patient coughs, bends over, or lifts heavy objects. In some cases, hernias have no symptoms and are only detected during routine medical exams.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients with uncomplicated hernias may experience only annoyance or discomfort. As the hernia opening expands, the discomfort will increase. Small openings are more likely to trap the intestine, potentially leading to intestinal damage or death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hernias are common in Africa. People often do very hard physical labor and lift heavy objects. Women tend to have more children than those in the United States. It is possible that some hernias have infectious or genetic causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts for three to eight hours, depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient will stay in the hospital anywhere from two days to eight weeks, again depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment is curative. The chance of intestinal strangulation or bowel obstruction reduces significantly.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Hernia repair is not a risky procedure, and it comes with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many patients will ignore a hernia until it becomes uncomfortable and seek care at that time. Some people will wear tighter pants or a tight band around the waist to prevent the intestine from protruding.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If the hernia is not “stuck,” patients tend to ignore it and adapt to living with it. However, this could lead to future complications.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Aung

Aung is a 15-year-old novice monk from Burma. He stays in the monastery in his village of Hpa-An. His parents own a piece of land where his father and oldest brother grow vegetables and fruits to sell. His family also grows vegetables for their own consumption. Two months ago, Aung developed headaches, and his head increased in size, especially the right side of his head. At that time, his father bought medication from the pharmacy to reduce his headaches. He took it for two days but did not feel better. Later on, his father took him to Hpa-An Hospital where he received a blood test and an x-ray. The doctor told his father to take him to Yangon but his father instead brought him to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Mae Sot, Thailand. On February 25th, Aung arrived at MTC and he was referred to Watsi Medical Partner's Mae Sot Hospital the next day. At MSH, the doctor has recommended a CT scan and also told Aung's father that Aung needs to replace the shunt he received in his head in 2016 that has helped treat his hydrocephalus condition; unfortunately, the shunt is now blocked. The family is hopeful that Watsi supporters may be able to support a shunt procedure as well. Currently, Aung suffers from headaches and the area where he had the shunt inserted into his head is slowly increasing in size. The area of his head that has increased in size is sensitive and he is not able to sleep on his right side. Doctors want Aung to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors further diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Aung's CT scan and care, scheduled for February 27th. Aung said, "When I lie down and sleep, I can sleep only on one side because the growth hurts if I lay on it." He is hoping to feel better with treatment.

31% funded

31%funded
$129raised
$285to go
Ma Ni

Ma Ni is a 30-year-old woman from Burma. In her free time, she likes to pray to Buddha. She and her husband work as government officers. Together they earn 414,000 kyat (approx. $414 USD) per month, which is not enough for any safety net after they pay their bills for utilities and other household expenses. One day in July 2019, Ma Ni stood up from her desk at work and had pain in her hip joints. She had to push her hand against her hips to help her walk. She did not think there was anything seriously wrong so she did not seek medical attention. However, two weeks after this incident, when she was going to work, she slipped and fell in front of her house. Right away her hips started to hurt and two weeks later, the pain gradually became severe. Her condition worsened day by day, although she visited several hospitals and had taken medications. Currently, Ma Ni has a lot of pain in her hips. She cannot walk for more than two minutes or the pain becomes unbearable. She does not feel comfortable when she lays down and has problems sleeping from the pain. She also needs help going to the bathroom and taking a shower. Fortunately, Ma Ni learned about Watsi's medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). At BCMF's care center, surgeons can perform a total hip replacement to relieve Ma Ni of her pain and allow her to walk easily. Treatment is scheduled for December 17th, and Ma Ni needs help raising $1,500 to pay for this procedure. Ma Ni said, "I had to send my son to my mother’s place in Mawlamyine and my husband also had to ask for leave. [When fully recovered] I want to take back my son from my mother and send him to school. I will support him in whatever he wants to become when he grows up.”

81% funded

81%funded
$1,221raised
$279to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Aung

Aung is a 15-year-old novice monk from Burma. He stays in the monastery in his village of Hpa-An. His parents own a piece of land where his father and oldest brother grow vegetables and fruits to sell. His family also grows vegetables for their own consumption. Two months ago, Aung developed headaches, and his head increased in size, especially the right side of his head. At that time, his father bought medication from the pharmacy to reduce his headaches. He took it for two days but did not feel better. Later on, his father took him to Hpa-An Hospital where he received a blood test and an x-ray. The doctor told his father to take him to Yangon but his father instead brought him to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Mae Sot, Thailand. On February 25th, Aung arrived at MTC and he was referred to Watsi Medical Partner's Mae Sot Hospital the next day. At MSH, the doctor has recommended a CT scan and also told Aung's father that Aung needs to replace the shunt he received in his head in 2016 that has helped treat his hydrocephalus condition; unfortunately, the shunt is now blocked. The family is hopeful that Watsi supporters may be able to support a shunt procedure as well. Currently, Aung suffers from headaches and the area where he had the shunt inserted into his head is slowly increasing in size. The area of his head that has increased in size is sensitive and he is not able to sleep on his right side. Doctors want Aung to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors further diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Aung's CT scan and care, scheduled for February 27th. Aung said, "When I lie down and sleep, I can sleep only on one side because the growth hurts if I lay on it." He is hoping to feel better with treatment.

31% funded

31%funded
$129raised
$285to go