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Success! Monic from Uganda raised $187 to fund a cyst removal on her head.

Monic
100%
  • $187 raised, $0 to go
$187
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Monic's treatment was fully funded on September 7, 2020.

Photo of Monic post-operation

June 22, 2020

Monic underwent surgery to remove a mass on her right ear.

Monic’s surgery was successful! Her doctors excised her postauricular lipoma, a mass on her right ear. She is recovering well and feels comfortable and beautiful. She will no longer experience teasing and will lead a happy and healthy life with her child. Her quality of life has improved significantly.

Monic shared, “Thank you, Watsi donors, for the generous heart you showed me even though we do not know each other. But I thank you very much for practicing the life of Christ and for restoring my life. I will continue tailoring to earn a living.”

Monic's surgery was successful! Her doctors excised her postauricular lipoma, a mass on her right ear. She is recovering well and feels comf...

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April 24, 2020

Monic is a tailor with her own small business in western Uganda. She is a 26-year-old mother of one. She has not been able to modernize her business due to limited finances. She was rejected by her in-laws due to her poor economic background, forcing her to be the only parent to her child. Her siblings are not in any formal employment, and most are struggling to meet their basic lifestyles.

Monic was born with a swell on her right ear. The painless auricular cyst has been increasing in size lately, causing her greater concern. Previously, she thought of it as a permanent disability but was encouraged by a friend to come to Nyakibale Hospital.

Monic was diagnosed with the cyst and surgery is recommended by the medical team. If not treated, she risks having the swell increase further. Monic appeals for financial assistance.

On April 25th, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Monic needs help to raise $187 to fund this procedure.

Monic says, “I know if this swelling is removed from my ear, I shall be well and I continue with tailoring.”

Monic is a tailor with her own small business in western Uganda. She is a 26-year-old mother of one. She has not been able to modernize her ...

Read more

Monic's Timeline

  • April 24, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Monic was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • April 25, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Monic received treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 26, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Monic's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 22, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Monic's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • September 07, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Monic's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 logo 300x300 edcompass logo

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 logo 300x300 edcompass logo
Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $187 for Monic's treatment
Hospital Fees
$96
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$29
Supplies
$28
Labs
$34
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of accessibility to treatment facilities, some of the patients have lived with masses for a long time. Access to medical facilities is difficult for people living in remote parts of Uganda.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is usually admitted for three days. They undergo three- to five-hour surgery depending on the location of the mass and whether it's cancerous. After surgery, they are continuously monitored in the wards.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Joseph

Joseph is a 19-year-old joyful boy who hails from the Mount Elgon area in Kenya. He shared that he is known around the village as the guy with the large mass due to his protruding hernia on his abdomen. In February 2019, Joseph was involved in a road traffic accident when he was headed home from his daily labor. He sustained injuries in his stomach where he was rushed to a hospital and an exploratory laparotomy was done. A few days later, Joseph was discharged from hospital and as his wounds were healing he started developing a mass on his stomach. Joseph feared to go to the hospital again because he didn’t want to be in pain. As the mass grew bigger, Joseph started worrying about his life. He went to his church pastor where the church raised money to send him to the capital city to get it removed but they were told he needed a specialist who demanded a lot of money which they could not afford. Joseph had given up on the possibility of getting treated. It was not until a friend asked his pastor to bring him to our hospital, where he was diagnosed with an incisional hernia that he was happy to be told that his condition can be treated. Joseph's father died of illness while he was young. He dropped out of school in Grade 4 because his mother re-married and she didn't have money to send him to school, so he began to work in farms to help get money for his daily needs like food. Joseph works in the farms and gardens and enjoys planting and farming. He wants to be able to have a big farm and grow lots of vegetables, corn, and millet. Joseph has gone to other doctors to help with his mass but everyone said it wasn’t operable. He is most disturbed by the way people who stare at him. Joseph is a very practical man and looks forward to going back to his farm and working hard to have a good crop and harvest and have a good life. Joseph is worried that he might not get a wife due to his condition. He is also facing stigma by people talking about his condition and has been denied work. If he is not treated, his condition will continue to worsen and his future plans feel bleak to him if he does not get treatment. Joseph told us, “I just want to be able to find a girl to marry and have a family.”

35% funded

35%funded
$165raised
$306to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.