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Meas is construction worker from Cambodia who needs $787 to fund surgery on his scalp.

Meas
66%
  • $527 raised, $260 to go
$527
raised
$260
to go
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August 6, 2020

Meas is a 17-year-old construction worker from Cambodia. He has two older brothers and one young sister. His parents are farmers. In addition to his construction work, he helps his parents with their farming. In his free time he enjoys playing soccer and listening to music.

In July 2020, Meas was burned on his head during an electrical accident at a worksite. He has developed an infected wound on his scalp and is in constant pain.

When Meas learned about our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, he traveled for two-and-a-half hours seeking treatment. On August 6th, surgeons at CSC will perform a skin flap procedure to to close the wound in his head and allow his burn to heal properly. Now, he needs help to fund this $787 procedure.

Meas shared, “Since my injury I cannot work or help my family and they are worried about me, so I hope I recover quickly so that I can work again.”

Meas is a 17-year-old construction worker from Cambodia. He has two older brothers and one young sister. His parents are farmers. In additio...

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Meas's Timeline

  • August 6, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Meas was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • August 06, 2020
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Meas was scheduled to receive treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 07, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Meas's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Meas is currently raising funds for his treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Meas's treatment update from Children's Surgical Centre.

Funded by 16 donors

Funded by 16 donors

Treatment
Severe Burn Treatment
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $787 for Meas's treatment
Hospital Fees
$160
Medical Staff
$579
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients have severe burns that develop infections. Patients cannot move easily and are in pain, preventing them from working. Burns may cause changes in physical appearance. Severe burns can be acid burns, gas fire burns, and electrical burns. These burns typically cover large portions of skin across multiple limbs.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Intentional attack burns are meant to disfigure and maim victims for life, so the social impacts of their burns are severe. Families may be heavily impacted by the attack, and victims may be socially isolated or have difficulty finding work.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Acid is widely available in Cambodia, with little or no regulation. It is commonly used in car and motorbike batteries, rubber processing, and jewelry making.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Severe burn victims stay at Children's Surgical Centre for up to three months, undergoing multiple surgeries to treat the burned skin. During the first debridement procedure, the burned skin is removed under general anesthesia. If there is any necrotic tissue, it is removed by a sharp dissection and cleaned with antiseptic agents. Once good granulation tissues are seen, the area is covered with a skin graft donated from the upper arm or thigh. When scars or contractures form (usually within one month after the burn), a z-plasty is needed. Surgeons make a z-shaped incision along the contracture area and release the tightened tissue. Dressings are applied. Additional post-operative care might involve physiotherapy and pressure garments.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The patient's infections will be treated, the skin will be healed, and he or she will enjoy improved confidence.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

These treatments are low-risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Severe burn treatments are available at burn units in Cambodia. However, because treatment requires a long hospital stay, the bill can become very expensive. When a patient cannot pay, he or she may be expelled from the hospital in the middle of a treatment plan.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Treatment outside of a hospital environment is very dangerous and can cause serious infections.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Min

Min lives with his wife, son, and daughter in a village in Tak Province, Thailand. He moved from Burma to Thailand nine months ago in search of better job opportunities. His daughter is still too young to go to school and his wife and son work as day laborers on a farm, each earning 150 baht (approx. 5 USD) per day. Min had to stop working with his wife and son three months ago because of his condition. Their monthly household income of 3,000 baht (approx. 100 USD) is not enough to cover their daily expenses. Sometimes, they have to borrow money from their relatives to meet their basic needs. Four years ago, Min used to work as a construction worker in Bangkok. One day, he started to experience pain in the left side of his abdomen. He went to a clinic twice and was diagnosed with a kidney stone in his left kidney after receiving an ultrasound. The doctor told him that he would need to undergo laser treatment at a hospital to break up the stone. The next day, Min went to a hospital in Bangkok. He received another ultrasound and underwent laser treatment which he did not have to pay for because he had health insurance at that time. When he returned for his follow-up appointment, he underwent another round of laser treatment, followed by more oral medications to take home. Min was not able to return to the hospital because his father passed away before his next appointment and he had to go back to Burma for the funeral. Before he had a chance to return to Bangkok, his mother also passed away. After spending money on the two funerals, Min did not have enough money to return to Bangkok. He moved back in with his wife and children and started working as a day laborer on a farm with his wife in their village. In May 2019, Min started experiencing pain again in his left lower abdomen. He would also pass small stones about twice a month while urinating. He went to a clinic where he received oral medication as well as an ultrasound. The doctor told him that he has a stone in his left kidney as well as small stones in his urethra. Min went back to the same clinic several times for his follow-up appointments, where he received oral medication each time for his abdominal pain. By September 2019, he was feeling much better and was no longer in pain. He was also no longer passing stones when urinating. Min then stopped going back to the clinic and stopped taking medication. Later in December 2019, Min and his family moved to their current home in Thailand and in May 2020, the pain in Min’s lower abdomen returned. He has pain when urinating and has started to pass small stones again about every two weeks. He went to a local hospital in the beginning of May with his wife, and he received an ultrasound. The ultrasound showed that he now has stones in both of his kidneys in addition to a bladder stone. The doctor referred him to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for treatment, but his family was not able to afford the estimated cost so he returned home. At home, Min told his friend about his condition and his lack of funds to pay for it. His friend told him to seek help at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) and with Watsi's Medical Parter Burma Children Medical Fund. Surgery is now scheduled for August 14th. Min shared, “I had to sell my phone to pay for my treatment [the ultrasounds and oral medications] and my transportation when I sought treatment. For the past few days, we don’t have enough rice and we also don’t have any money to buy more food. So we have to eat rice porridge. I feel so sad for my family.”

80% funded

80%funded
$1,204raised
$296to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.