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Success! Lors from Cambodia raised $637 to fund brachial plexus repair surgery.

Lors
100%
  • $637 raised, $0 to go
$637
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Lors's treatment was fully funded on October 27, 2020.

Photo of Lors post-operation

December 23, 2019

Lors underwent brachial plexus repair surgery.

Lors’s surgery went well and he’s doing light physiotherapy as he begins the long recovery process. Lors will need to work hard over the next six months to rebuild muscle in his arm, which will allow him to regain function. Lors hopes to return to his village and playing soccer with his friends as soon as he can.

“I am so glad that I can use my hand again and can return to my work without any problems,” Lors said.

Lors's surgery went well and he's doing light physiotherapy as he begins the long recovery process. Lors will need to work hard over the nex...

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December 10, 2019

Lors is a 26-year-old rubber plantation worker from Cambodia. He has two daughters and enjoys playing soccer, listening to music, and helping around the house when he is not working.

In July 2019, Lors was in a motorcycle accident and collided with a truck, injuring his left arm. He has been diagnosed with a brachial plexus injury on his left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. He experiences pain and has lost sensation in his shoulder and is unable to move his arm.

Lors traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On December 11th, he will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, he will be able to regain sensation and move his arm again. Our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, is requesting $637 to fund this procedure.

“I hope that my hand will be back to full function just like before, and then I can return to work again,” Lors shared.

Lors is a 26-year-old rubber plantation worker from Cambodia. He has two daughters and enjoys playing soccer, listening to music, and helpin...

Read more

Lors's Timeline

  • December 10, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Lors was submitted by Lindsay Bownik, Stakeholder Relations Officer at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • December 11, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Lors received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 11, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Lors's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 23, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Lors's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • October 27, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Lors's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 14 donors

Funded by 14 donors

Treatment
Brachial Plexus Injury Surgery
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $637 for Lors's treatment
Hospital Fees
$86
Medical Staff
$503
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of brachial plexus injury (BPI) vary on the severity and location of the injury, but include muscle weakness, loss of sensation, pain, and paralysis. BPI can cause neuropathic pain with damage to the spinal cord and can be long-lasting, with effects such as burning numbness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The impact of a brachial plexus injury can range in severity; some patients may experience weakness or great pain, others may be paralyzed in their shoulder and upper arm. This can make day-to-day tasks difficult and impair quality of life.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Motorcycle collisions are the most common cause of brachial plexus injury, and are, unfortunately, an exceedingly common occurrence in Cambodia.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Treatment for brachial plexus injury can involve nerve repair, nerve grafting, nerve transfer, or tendon and muscle transfers depending on the location and type of injury, and the amount of time since the injury occurred. A nerve repair involves reattaching a severed nerve; nerve graft is a procedure that takes a healthy nerve from another part of the body and transplants it to the injured nerve to guide regrowth; a nerve transfer is a procedure that cuts a donor nerve and connects it to the injured nerve when there is no functioning nerve stump to attach a graft. Nerve regeneration occurs approximately at a rate of 1 mm/day, and so recovery from a brachial plexus injury can take months for small improvements. Physical therapy during this time is important to prevent stiffness, contractures, or atrophy and increase the chances of regaining good movement in the affected limb.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

While BPI surgery may not restore full movement to a patient, it can greatly increase the patient’s ability to use the affected limb and reduce the pain of the injury.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

BPI surgery is complicated and risks include infection as well as failure to restore movement, which would require further surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Surgery to treat brachial plexus injury can be very complex and not widely performed. Surgical treatment in Cambodia can be expensive and hard to access. Patients will travel for hours by car, motocycle, and bus to receive free surgery at CSC.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Brachial plexus injury can have a range of severity; some patients may be able to be treated by splinting or physical therapy, but serious cases require surgical intervention. These types of injuries do not have alternatives to improving movement and functionality.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Alamunyaki

Alamunyaki is an 11-year-old boy and the fourth born in a family of five children. Alamunyaki is a very social and hard-working boy. He has not had the chance to join school due to his parent’s financial challenges. There is hope for Alamunyaki joining school because one of his uncles has offered to take him and support him in school next year. It is also Alamunyaki’s uncle who decided to seek treatment for his nephew who has burn contracture on his right hand from the elbow all the way down to the wrist and fingers, making it impossible for him to hold things with the hand. Alamunyaki’s parents are small scale farmers of maize and vegetables, which they mostly use for their own consumption and sell what they can of the harvest in order to get money to buy other commodities. They also have a few goats which Alamunyaki and his siblings help their parents in grazing. Alamunyaki was involved in a fire accident when he was two years old. He was at the fireplace with his siblings warming themselves while their mother was preparing dinner. Alamunyaki was dressed in his traditional maasai clothing which caught fire by accident. Alamunyaki sustained a severe burn and needed to be taken to the hospital but due to his parent’s financial constraints they couldn’t take him and treated him at home using herbal and traditional medicines. The skin around the burns has contracted making it impossible for him to use his right hand. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Alamunyaki receive treatment. On March 3rd, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to he will be able to use his. Now, their family needs help to fund this $639 procedure. Alamunyaki’s uncle says: “I would like my nephew to go to school next year but I understand it’s not going to be easy if he does not have his right hand correct. Kindly help him because his parents cannot afford the cost.”

64% funded

64%funded
$413raised
$226to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.