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Success! Khefa from Tanzania raised $890 to fund clubfoot repair.

Khefa
100%
  • $890 raised, $0 to go
$890
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Khefa's treatment was fully funded on October 18, 2019.

Photo of Khefa post-operation

October 6, 2019

Khefa underwent clubfoot repair.

Khefa’s treatment is going on well and his right foot is showing great progress. He is currently on his fifth cast change. This treatment will help Khefa have normal feet and be able to wall well without going through the pain and difficulty he was going through. It will also save him from the discrimination that comes along with this kind of disability.

Khefa’s mother says, “We had lost hope of ever raising the money to treat our son due to financial challenges but thanks to your funding program our son was able to have his treatment. Thank you very much.”

Khefa’s treatment is going on well and his right foot is showing great progress. He is currently on his fifth cast change. This treatment wi...

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August 5, 2019

Khefa is a baby from Tanzania. Khefa has clubfoot of his right foot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes.

Fortunately, Khefa traveled to visit our medical partner’s care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on August 6. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $890 to fund Khefa’s clubfoot repair.

Khefa’s mother says, “With the little income we have we will never be able to afford our son’s treatment cost, please help us.”

Khefa is a baby from Tanzania. Khefa has clubfoot of his right foot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This...

Read more

Khefa's Timeline

  • August 5, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Khefa was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare Foundation, our medical partner in Tanzania.

  • August 06, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Khefa received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 10, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Khefa's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 06, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Khefa's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • October 18, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Khefa's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 17 donors

Funded by 17 donors

Treatment
Clubfoot
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $890 for Khefa's treatment
Hospital Fees
$693
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$8
Supplies
$175
Labs
$14
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The foot is turned inward, often severely, at the ankle, and the arch of the foot is very high. Patients experience discomfort, and the affected leg may be shorter and smaller than the other.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

These children have a difficult time walking and running. Years of trying to walk on a clubfoot will cause wounds and other skeletal problems, such as arthritis. Patients will have difficulty fitting in shoes and participating in normal play, school, and daily activities. Many Africans make their livings through manual labor, which can be difficult with an untreated clubfoot.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Incidence is 1/1,000 live births, or about 1,600 cases in Tanzania annually. This is roughly similar to rates in Western countries, though many cases may be missed. There is no known reason for its occurrence in this region.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Patients will undergo a series of small operations, casting, and manipulations during their course of treatment. Patients will stay in the Plaster House, a rehabilitation center for children in Tanzania, for as long as their recovery takes.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joint will become aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Clubfoot is very treatable. The surgery is minor and not risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. Most patients live in remote, rural areas and are identified through mobile outreach. The pediatric surgical program at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre was started to meet the large burden of pediatric disability in the region.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If not treated, the condition will persist and will result in disability.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Zin

Zin is a 37-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her husband, son and two daughters in Myawaddy, Karen State. Her 17-year-old son and 13-year-old daughter go to school while her youngest daughter stays home as she is still very young. To make a living, Zin used to make different Burmese snacks and sell them at the nearby villages. But she recently stopped working due to her health condition. Sometimes, her husband works as a day labourer but Zin said she does not know how much he earns from that. Six months ago, Zin started to experience stomach-ache so she went to a clinic. The doctor there did not do any investigations, instead, just prescribed her oral medication. Although Zin felt better with the medications she received at the clinic, her symptom returned after two months and she went back to see the same doctor. The doctor again prescribed her medications, but they only relieved her symptoms for a short time. In early September, Zin felt like her stomach-ache has worsened. She had it more often and the medications that she received at the clinic did not help her anymore. On 12 September 2019, Zin had a severe stomach-ache and for the last time, she returned to see the same doctor. On this visit, the doctor performed an ultrasound and said that there are stones in her common bile duct (CBD), a duct that carries bile from the gallbladder and liver into the duodenum (upper part of the small intestine). Zin has been advised to undergo a biliary obstruction repair, a procedure to repair the blockage of the bile ducts, which carry bile from the liver to the gallbladder. If left untreated, Zin's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. After seeking treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Zin is scheduled to undergo her biliary obstruction repair on October 03. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Zin's procedure and care. Zin said, “I cannot do anything now. I want to get well soon and start working again. If not, my family will not have enough food”.

86% funded

86%funded
$1,297raised
$203to go
Anifa

Anifa is a student from Tanzania. Anifa is a friendly third born child in a family of four. Her mother describes her as hardworking both in school and at home. The class five student suffered severe burns on her left arm when she was three years old. While playing children's cooking games with her friends, Anifa's clothing caught fire as she was placing the cooking tin on the open fire. The severe burns saw her admitted to the hospital for a month. She healed with contractures on her left hand and armpit. At five years, she was funded by a visiting team of surgeons for a contracture release of the arm. However, the contractures on her axilla remain. The contractures limit her hand movement making it challenging to perform daily tasks. When her mother heard about our funding program from our outreach team who had visited their village, she brought her in to ask for help. Anifa is planned for a release and Z-plasty surgery in our ALMC hospital. Anifa's parents are small scale farmers of maize, rice and vegetables. Their income is limited to cater for the surgical cost and appeal for financial assistance Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Anifa receive treatment. On September 27th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to The surgery will restore Anifa's ability to move her hand with ease. Now, she needs help to fund this $608 procedure. Anifa’s mother says, “We have always wanted to treat our daughter and correct the remaining part but due to lack of money we have not been able to do that kindly help our daughter if it’s possible.”

88% funded

88%funded
$537raised
$71to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Zin

Zin is a 37-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her husband, son and two daughters in Myawaddy, Karen State. Her 17-year-old son and 13-year-old daughter go to school while her youngest daughter stays home as she is still very young. To make a living, Zin used to make different Burmese snacks and sell them at the nearby villages. But she recently stopped working due to her health condition. Sometimes, her husband works as a day labourer but Zin said she does not know how much he earns from that. Six months ago, Zin started to experience stomach-ache so she went to a clinic. The doctor there did not do any investigations, instead, just prescribed her oral medication. Although Zin felt better with the medications she received at the clinic, her symptom returned after two months and she went back to see the same doctor. The doctor again prescribed her medications, but they only relieved her symptoms for a short time. In early September, Zin felt like her stomach-ache has worsened. She had it more often and the medications that she received at the clinic did not help her anymore. On 12 September 2019, Zin had a severe stomach-ache and for the last time, she returned to see the same doctor. On this visit, the doctor performed an ultrasound and said that there are stones in her common bile duct (CBD), a duct that carries bile from the gallbladder and liver into the duodenum (upper part of the small intestine). Zin has been advised to undergo a biliary obstruction repair, a procedure to repair the blockage of the bile ducts, which carry bile from the liver to the gallbladder. If left untreated, Zin's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. After seeking treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Zin is scheduled to undergo her biliary obstruction repair on October 03. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Zin's procedure and care. Zin said, “I cannot do anything now. I want to get well soon and start working again. If not, my family will not have enough food”.

86% funded

86%funded
$1,297raised
$203to go