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Bernice is a 2-year-old from Kenya who needs $768 to fund congenital umbilical hernia surgery.

Bernice
56%
  • $431 raised, $337 to go
$431
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$337
to go
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May 21, 2020

Bernice is a two and a half year old and the firstborn to her mother, who is raising Bernice on her own. Bernice’s mother is the fifth born in a large family of seven siblings.

Bernice’s mother completed Form Four schooling two years ago, however, she was not able to continue with her studies due to financial pressures. However, since she had performed well, a well-wisher supported her to join a nursing college in Nakuru. She lives with her mother (Bernice’s grandmother) who is chronically sick from a spinal injury. During the school holiday’s Bernice’s mother does clothes washing for people, in order to support her baby.

Bernice was born with a congenital umbilical hernia. Her mother assumed that it would to heal, but the condition progressed. She was taken to a general hospital, where she was referred to Watsi’s Medical Partner Care Center. During our interview, Bernice’s mother said that she has been looking for funds to bring her baby for the treatment, however, it has been very difficult. Bernice’s mother shared, “I wish I can get help for my baby.”

Bernice is a two and a half year old and the firstborn to her mother, who is raising Bernice on her own. Bernice’s mother is the fifth born ...

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Bernice's Timeline

  • May 21, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Bernice was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Kenya.

  • May 22, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Bernice's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • May 26, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Bernice received treatment at Maua Methodist Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Bernice is currently raising funds for her treatment.

  • July 09, 2020
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Bernice's treatment update from African Mission Healthcare.

Funded by 18 donors

Funded by 18 donors

Treatment
Hernia / Hydrocele Repair
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $768 for Bernice's treatment
Hospital Fees
$512
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$15
Supplies
$241
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A hernia occurs when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the lower abdominal wall, usually for one of two reasons. The first is a congenital abnormality in which the tissues did not close. The second is excessive stress in an adult, often due to heavy physical labor or pregnancy. Patients experience a bulge or lump in the affected area. The hernia may cause the patient to feel pain, discomfort, weakness, pressure, and sensations of heaviness or aching. These symptoms are often exacerbated when the patient coughs, bends over, or lifts heavy objects. In some cases, hernias have no symptoms and are only detected during routine medical exams.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients with uncomplicated hernias may experience only annoyance or discomfort. As the hernia opening expands, the discomfort will increase. Small openings are more likely to trap the intestine, potentially leading to intestinal damage or death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hernias are common in Africa. People often do very hard physical labor and lift heavy objects. Women tend to have more children than those in developed countries. It is possible that some hernias have infectious or genetic causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts for three to eight hours, depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient will stay in the hospital anywhere from two days to eight weeks, again depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment is curative. The chance of intestinal strangulation or bowel obstruction reduces significantly.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Hernia repair is not a high-risk procedure, and it comes with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many patients will ignore a hernia until it becomes uncomfortable and seek care at that time. Some people will wear supportive bands or clothing around the waist to prevent the intestine from protruding.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If the hernia is not “stuck,” patients tend to ignore it and adapt to living with it. However, this could lead to future complications.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Sar

Sar is a four-year-old girl from Thailand who lives with her parents and three sisters. Her mother is a homemaker, looking after household chores, while her father works as an agriculture day laborer. In her spare time, Sar likes to play with toys with her friends. Seven months ago, when Sar was on the way to buy snacks, a hen suddenly flew over to her and poked her right eye, protecting her baby chickens. Although Sar's eye turned red, her parents did not take her to any hospitals. They bought eye drops for her, but the medicine did not make her feel any better. Sar underwent a CT scan at Mae Sot Hospital but the doctor was not able to help her. She was referred to Chiang Mai and there she underwent an MRI. After the MRI, the doctor recommended surgery to remove her right eye. She received enucleation of her eye on July 25th, 2019. After enucleation, the doctor recommended an MRI to see if there is any problem post operation. She is now admitting in the hospital and will undergo the MRI on 25th February, 2020. Doctors want Sar to have an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs, to help them continue to follow an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $968 to cover the cost of Sar's MRI and care, scheduled for February 25th. Sar's father said, "My daughter is healthy and playing happily with friends after we came back from treatment in Chiang Mai. The doctor told me that they will do MRI for my daughter to check if there is any abnormal growth or problem after surgery and if there is no problem after the MRI result, the doctor will implant an artificial eye in the next eight month for my daughter."

67% funded

67%funded
$658raised
$310to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.