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Success! Saron from Cambodia raised $292 to fund eye surgery.

Saron
100%
  • $292 raised, $0 to go
$292
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Saron's treatment was fully funded on December 31, 2019.

Photo of Saron post-operation

December 3, 2019

Saron underwent eye surgery.

Saron’s operation went smoothly and she has returned home. Her eye is a little bit swollen after surgery, but she’s been given drops to reduce inflammation and prevent infection. Following surgery, Saron’s eyes have been corrected, improving her vision and confidence.

Saron said, “I am so happy that my eyes are corrected and that they look straight. I am feeling much more confident and am no longer shy like before.”

Saron's operation went smoothly and she has returned home. Her eye is a little bit swollen after surgery, but she's been given drops to redu...

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November 19, 2019

Saron is a 53-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. She is the youngest of eight siblings, and enjoys watching Khmer dramas on television in her free time.

Saron has strabismus in both eyes. Strabismus is a misalignment of the eye caused by injury or dysfunction in the associated nerves and muscles. She is unable to see clearly and she cannot work.

Saron traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On November 20th, surgeons at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), will perform a corrective procedure to align her eyes. Now, Saron needs help to raise $292 to fund this procedure.

Saron said, “I hope that after my surgery, I will be able to see clearly and I can return to working on the rice farm.”

Saron is a 53-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. She is the youngest of eight siblings, and enjoys watching Khmer dramas on television in h...

Read more

Saron's Timeline

  • November 19, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Saron was submitted by Lindsay Bownik, Stakeholder Relations Officer at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • November 20, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Saron received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 26, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Saron's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 03, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Saron's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 31, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Saron's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 3 donors

Funded by 3 donors

Treatment
Squint / Strabismus
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $292 for Saron's treatment
Hospital Fees
$62
Medical Staff
$190
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A strabismus is a condition in which the eyes are not properly aligned with each other. This can cause decreased vision in children and double vision in adults.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

In children, strabismus can cause amblyopia, or lazy eye, where the vision development is stunted. If not treated early enough, amblyopia can cause permanent decreased vision or blindness. In adults, strabismus can cause double vision, which can be severely debilitating. In addition to headaches and eye strain, symptoms may include an inability to read comfortably, fatigue when reading, and unstable or "jittery" vision. Notably, strabismus interferes with normal eye contact, often causing embarrassment, anger, and feelings of awkwardness. It affects social communication in a fundamental way, with a possible negative effect on self esteem. One study showed that the behavior of strabismic children was marked by inhibition, anxiety, and emotional disorders.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The etiology for strabismus in children is poorly understood. Strabismus affects children worldwide and is reported to be present in about 4% of children.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgeons identify and move muscles in the eye in order to straighten the eye. The conjunctiva (clear covering of the white part of the eye) is opened to reveal the muscle and then closed. This is usually done under general anesthesia.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

For children, straightening the eyes can help treat amblyopia and allow the pathway from the eyes to the brain to develop normally. For adults, straightening the eyes will improve double vision.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Strabismus surgery can cure the problem. The risk of surgery is low. Certain congenital disorders and syndromes can present with strabismus. In this case, children are fully evaluated by medical specialists.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Strabismus is primarily a surgical problem. Many patients travel from far provinces to our medical partner because they cannot receive this care locally.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Some strabismus can be treated with glasses or prisms, but surgery is usually needed.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Shadrack

Shadrack is a three year old boy from Tanzania and the second-born child in a family of three children. He is a friendly and playful boy who is happy and smiling most of the time. Shadrack was born with deformed legs, the right leg had been affected at the foot missing all the toes and is bent inward while the left was missing the lower part from below his knee. This condition has made it difficult and painful for Shadrack to walk, he mostly moves using his knees which has caused him to have wounds most of the time. Shadrack received surgery in November 2019 so he will be able to use prosthetics on the amputated leg to walk. He now needs treatment for his right leg and club foot. This treatment will enable Shadrack to walk better using both his legs and he will not be subjected to stigma as he is growing up. Shadrack’s mother heard about our Watsi partner from an outreach team that visited their village and Shadrack’s mother brought him for help. Shadrack’s mother is a small scale farmer who strives to provide for Shadrack and his siblings on her own since her husband abandoned her after the birth of their last born. She is not able to afford Shadrack’s surgery, she needs help. Fortunately, Shadrack traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on January 3rd. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $890 to fund Shadrack's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk more easily. Shadrack’s mother says, “Please help my son so that he is able to walk without difficulty.”

51% funded

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$458raised
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Richard

Richard is a farmer from Kenya. Father of six Richard is a small scale farmer. He plants maize and beans in his farm. Richard doesn’t have a good house to live in. He stays in a two room house roofed with grass. None of his children completed school due to low income in the family. The family has gone through a hard-time that they even lack food some of the days. Two months ago, Richard was involved in a road traffic accident and sustained a complex femur fracture on his left leg. Richard was brought to our hospital where he underwent a successful intramedullary nail femur surgery on 8/08/2019. He was discharged where he has been recovering at home. On his first surgical review, the surgeon realized that Richard is unable to get full extension of the femur. On further examination he realized that Richard had shortened femur and suggested that he needs revision surgery to fix his this condition for previous surgery done that was not successful. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On October 07, Richard will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will help him walk easily again Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $968 to fund this procedure. Richard says, “I am really worried about the fate of my leg. I thought it was getting well. I have nothing to offer for my second surgery. Help me raise funds to make it possible and a success."

83% funded

83%funded
$804raised
$164to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Shadrack

Shadrack is a three year old boy from Tanzania and the second-born child in a family of three children. He is a friendly and playful boy who is happy and smiling most of the time. Shadrack was born with deformed legs, the right leg had been affected at the foot missing all the toes and is bent inward while the left was missing the lower part from below his knee. This condition has made it difficult and painful for Shadrack to walk, he mostly moves using his knees which has caused him to have wounds most of the time. Shadrack received surgery in November 2019 so he will be able to use prosthetics on the amputated leg to walk. He now needs treatment for his right leg and club foot. This treatment will enable Shadrack to walk better using both his legs and he will not be subjected to stigma as he is growing up. Shadrack’s mother heard about our Watsi partner from an outreach team that visited their village and Shadrack’s mother brought him for help. Shadrack’s mother is a small scale farmer who strives to provide for Shadrack and his siblings on her own since her husband abandoned her after the birth of their last born. She is not able to afford Shadrack’s surgery, she needs help. Fortunately, Shadrack traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on January 3rd. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $890 to fund Shadrack's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk more easily. Shadrack’s mother says, “Please help my son so that he is able to walk without difficulty.”

51% funded

51%funded
$458raised
$432to go