Limited 2x MATCH opportunity: Become a or increase your today!
Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Success! Francis from Kenya raised $660 for surgery to treat his broken arm.

Francis
100%
  • $660 raised, $0 to go
$660
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Francis's treatment was fully funded on July 13, 2016.

Photo of Francis post-operation

September 15, 2016

Francis received surgery to treat his broken arm.

Francis underwent successful treatment. He now has reduced pain in his arm, and is looking forward to full recovery. He will now be able to work using his hand, and chances of further infection have been reduced by the surgery.

“Thanks for the support,” Francis shared. “I will be able to use my hand to earn a living for myself and not to rely on my aged father.”

Francis underwent successful treatment. He now has reduced pain in his arm, and is looking forward to full recovery. He will now be able to ...

Read more
July 4, 2016

“I want to have my arm treated so that I am able to work for myself,” Francis shares. Francis is a 45-year-old man from rural Kenya. In December 2015, he fell from a tall tree that he was pruning, and broke his left humerus, or upper arm bone.

Francis was initially taken to the hospital, where doctors applied a splint to his arm. However, the injury has not healed as much as it should have by now. As a result, Francis experiences pain and numbness in his left hand—especially when the weather is cold. Francis’s doctors are now recommending that he undergo surgery to ensure that his arm recovers correctly.

Before the accident, Francis used to work at a construction site to earn a living. However, he has not been able to do any work since he fell from the tree. He has to rely on help from his aged parents and help from his siblings. Furthermore, if he is not treated, Francis will continue to feel pain in his left hand. The fractured bone could also become infected.

Although Francis’s family has been able to pool together $104 for the surgery that he needs, this is not enough money to fully cover the procedure. However, for $660, we can sponsor Francis’s operation, as well as the x-rays, medications, and hospital stay necessary to his post-surgery recovery.

Let’s help Francis regain his independence and fund this important treatment.

“I want to have my arm treated so that I am able to work for myself,” Francis shares. Francis is a 45-year-old man from rural Kenya. In Dece...

Read more

Francis's Timeline

  • July 4, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Francis was submitted by Beatrice Njoroge, Curative Medical Support Program Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • July 4, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Francis received treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • July 8, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Francis's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 13, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Francis's treatment was fully funded.

  • September 15, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Francis's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 5 donors

Profile 48x48 image
Profile 48x48 dsc 0062
Profile 48x48 highres untitled shoot 013

Funded by 5 donors

Profile 48x48 image
Profile 48x48 dsc 0062
Profile 48x48 highres untitled shoot 013
Treatment
ORIF Mandible/Simple
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

This procedure corrects a severe, poorly aligned fracture where the ends of affected bones are far apart. Such a fracture may occur anywhere in the body (leg, hip, arm, jaw, etc) usually as a result of trauma. Common symptoms include extreme pain, inability/difficulty in using limbs, and deformed limbs.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

A non-union leads to chronic disability, pain, and inability to work.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Car/motorcycle taxi accidents are the number one cause. Work-related accidents and violence are others. The condition is more common largely because African roads (particularly Kenyan roads, where this procedure is approved) are among some of the most dangerous in the world.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

In general, an ORIF (open-reduction internal-fixation) procedure uses rods or plates to bring multiple parts of bone together and help them heal correctly.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Curative. An ORIF fixes the broken bone, restoring it to complete function and enabling the patient to be able to work.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This procedure has medium surgical risk but most trauma patients are young and tolerate the procedure well. Overall, the risk of surgery is less than the risks of the alternative (traction), or doing nothing. There is a risk of the metal becoming infected, which would require antibiotics and perhaps removal of the hardware and a second surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality orthopedic centers in developing countries. Often patients have received initial care for a fracture at another hospital and may have been placed in “traction.” This involves placing the affected limb in a cast under tension for prolonged periods to try to re-align the bones. Those who have funds try to make their way to a place like Kijabe Hospital. Most patients seen in Kijabe who are in need of an ORIF are patients who have been mismanaged in other hospitals. Usually, those hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat them.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

As mentioned, traction is an alternative for some — but not all — cases. And traction requires a patient to be in the hospital, immobile, for months — leading not only to lost wages but risk of bedsores, blood clots, and hospital-acquired infections.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Myint

Myint is a 57-year-old man who lives by himself in a village in Burma. His wife lives in Thailand, but since she lost her work due to COVID-19, she hasn't been able to send back money for basic things like she usually does. They are in a hard postion because she also cannot come back to Burma because she doesn’t feel safe because of civil war that has started. Myint is a day labourer who earns 3,000 kyat (approx. 3 USD) per day. His monthly income of 100,000 kyat (approx. 100 USD) is not enough to cover his daily expenses nor pay for basic health care. Last month, Myint went out fishing and he caught a catfish. While he tried to hang the fish, the catfish fell onto his left instep. The catfish’s fin which is poisonous injured his left instep. He went to small clinic and got treatment. But his wound did not improve and instead he had swelling and it become infected. The village clinic doctor told him if the wound is not improve to go to see the specialist. Since he didn't have money, Myint went to visit a monk to seek the treatment. The monk gave him traditional medicine (an herb) for the wound. However, after using the traditional medicine for one month, his foot continued to worsen. Eventually, his friend recommended that he seek treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH). At the hospital, the doctor examined his foot and saw that he had developed an ulcer. The doctor said that they would need to perform surgery on his ulcer to clean it properly and remove any damaged or necrotic tissue. When Myint told the doctor he had no money to pay for the surgery, the doctor referred him to our Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing further treatment. Currently, Myint’s left foot is swollen and the skin around his ulcer is discoloured. He cannot sleep well at night due to the pain. He also has difficulty sleeping due to worrying about his foot and his economic situation. He is worried that if his leg has to be amputated, he will not be able to earn money to support his family. He's trying to remain hopeful and told us, “In the future I would like to grow and sell mushrooms so that I can support my family financially.”

74% funded

74%funded
$515raised
$179to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Myint

Myint is a 57-year-old man who lives by himself in a village in Burma. His wife lives in Thailand, but since she lost her work due to COVID-19, she hasn't been able to send back money for basic things like she usually does. They are in a hard postion because she also cannot come back to Burma because she doesn’t feel safe because of civil war that has started. Myint is a day labourer who earns 3,000 kyat (approx. 3 USD) per day. His monthly income of 100,000 kyat (approx. 100 USD) is not enough to cover his daily expenses nor pay for basic health care. Last month, Myint went out fishing and he caught a catfish. While he tried to hang the fish, the catfish fell onto his left instep. The catfish’s fin which is poisonous injured his left instep. He went to small clinic and got treatment. But his wound did not improve and instead he had swelling and it become infected. The village clinic doctor told him if the wound is not improve to go to see the specialist. Since he didn't have money, Myint went to visit a monk to seek the treatment. The monk gave him traditional medicine (an herb) for the wound. However, after using the traditional medicine for one month, his foot continued to worsen. Eventually, his friend recommended that he seek treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH). At the hospital, the doctor examined his foot and saw that he had developed an ulcer. The doctor said that they would need to perform surgery on his ulcer to clean it properly and remove any damaged or necrotic tissue. When Myint told the doctor he had no money to pay for the surgery, the doctor referred him to our Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing further treatment. Currently, Myint’s left foot is swollen and the skin around his ulcer is discoloured. He cannot sleep well at night due to the pain. He also has difficulty sleeping due to worrying about his foot and his economic situation. He is worried that if his leg has to be amputated, he will not be able to earn money to support his family. He's trying to remain hopeful and told us, “In the future I would like to grow and sell mushrooms so that I can support my family financially.”

74% funded

74%funded
$515raised
$179to go