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Success! Kyarisiima from Uganda raised $187 to fund a mass removal procedure.

Kyarisiima
100%
  • $187 raised, $0 to go
$187
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Kyarisiima's treatment was fully funded on April 22, 2019.

Photo of Kyarisiima post-operation

February 27, 2019

Kyarisiima underwent a mass removal procedure.

She is no longer in pain and can return to her work.

She is no longer in pain and can return to her work....

February 15, 2019

Kyarisiima is a tailor from Uganda. She is married with one child.

For 13 years, Kyarisiima has had a swelling on her right wrist. She traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On February 18, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Kyarisiima needs help to raise $187 to fund this procedure.

Kyarisiima says, “I hope to get better quality of life and continue with tailoring after surgery.”

Kyarisiima is a tailor from Uganda. She is married with one child. For 13 years, Kyarisiima has had a swelling on her right wrist. She t...

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Kyarisiima's Timeline

  • February 15, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Kyarisiima was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • February 15, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Kyarisiima's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • February 19, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Kyarisiima received treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 27, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Kyarisiima's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • April 22, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Kyarisiima's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 6 donors

Funded by 6 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $187 for Kyarisiima's treatment
Hospital Fees
$96
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$29
Supplies
$28
Labs
$34
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of accessibility to treatment facilities, some of the patients have lived with masses for a long time. Access to medical facilities is difficult for people living in remote parts of Uganda.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is usually admitted for three days. They undergo three- to five-hour surgery depending on the location of the mass and whether it's cancerous. After surgery, they are continuously monitored in the wards.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Solomon

Solomon is a young boy from Kenya who four months ago was diagnosed with a right undescended testis. This is a condition where testis are not in a scrotal sac as expected in a baby boy soon after birth. Solomon arrived at the hospital today in the company of his mother and grandmother. His mother walks in with a limp and a crutch for support. Solomon is quick to grab a seat for his mother, something that depicts how respectful he is. While giving him a bath recently, Solomon’s mother noticed a slight swell on his groin which was painful. Solomon confessed that it had been there for some time but really never bothered him. Solomon’s mother took him to the nearest hospital where he was diagnosed and surgery recommended. Solomon was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. The cost of surgery was however way too high for them to cover. Recently, a friend advised that they visit Watsi Partner BethanyKids Kijabe where they could better access financial assistance. The diagnosis has been confirmed and surgery is advised. If not treated, Solomon is at a risk of suffering fertility issues, testicular cancer and/ or inguinal hernia. Solomon is the firstborn of three children and lives with his parents and siblings in a one-room house in Central Kenya. While Kenya has a national health insurance system, his parents have passed difficulties that have led to them to defaulting on NHIF premiums for quite some time--a situation that is common in Kenya. However, the hospital team counseled them on its importance and they promised to try and keep up with the payments. The little savings the family had were exhausted in getting treatment for Solomon’s mother who was involved in an accident sometimes back. Solomon’s father, the sole breadwinner, practices subsistence farming and at times takes up casual farming jobs to sustain his family’s needs. They are therefore appealing for help towards Solomon’s surgical care. Solomon will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on January 30th. AMHF is requesting $535 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. “I want to be a teacher when I grow up,” says Solomon.

22% funded

22%funded
$120raised
$415to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.