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Turyahebwa from Uganda raised $219 to fund treatment for precancerous cervical lesions.

Turyahebwa
100%
  • $219 raised, $0 to go
$219
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Turyahebwa's treatment was fully funded on March 18, 2021.
July 8, 2021

Turyahebwa has had her treatment postponed.

Our medical partner just shared that Turyahebwa has developed high anxiety toward undergoing surgery and her surgeon has recommended mental health support before her procedure moves forward. Our partner has asked that we cancel her case for the time being and will move forward with treatment as soon as she is ready.

Our medical partner just shared that Turyahebwa has developed high anxiety toward undergoing surgery and her surgeon has recommended mental ...

Read more
February 21, 2021

Turyahebwa is a middle-aged woman and mother of seven who farms along with with her husband. Their farm output helps them to meet their basic needs. Her children are now married and with families of their own and find it challenging to offer her support as they are not formally employed.

For the past 6 months, Turyahebwa has been feeling symptoms and has reduced her activities on the farm due to her pain. She came to Watsi’s Medical Partner Care Center Nyakibale Hospital where doctors have diagnosed her with premalignany cervical lesions. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus, but is afraid of the cost of surgery. Turayhebwa appeals for help to undergo the treatment. If not treated, the lesions might turn cancerous and spread resulting in premature death.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $219 to fund Turyahebwa’s surgery. On February 23rd, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner’s care center. Once recovered, Turyahebwa will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and have a better quality of life.

Turyahebwa says: “I am afraid that the condition may turn into cancer if not treated. I hope to resume farming once I am treated to cater for my family.”

Turyahebwa is a middle-aged woman and mother of seven who farms along with with her husband. Their farm output helps them to meet their basi...

Read more

Turyahebwa's Timeline

  • February 21, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Turyahebwa was submitted by Edward Mugane, Impact Assessment Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • February 23, 2021
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Turyahebwa was scheduled to receive treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 25, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Turyahebwa's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 8, 2021
    FUNDING ENDED

    Turyahebwa is no longer raising funds.

  • July 8, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Turyahebwa's treatment did not happen. Read the update.

Funded by 1 donor

Funded by 1 donor

Treatment
Total Abdominal Hysterectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $219 for Turyahebwa's treatment
Hospital Fees
$126
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$17
Supplies
$59
Labs
$6
Other
$11
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms vary depending on the condition that requires the total abdominal hysterectomy. If the cause is cervical, uterine, or ovarian cancer, there may not be symptoms, especially if the cancer is early-stage. In more advanced cases of cervical and uterine cancers, abnormal bleeding, unusual discharge, and pelvic or abdominal pain can occur. Symptoms of ovarian cancer may include trouble eating, trouble feeling full, bloating, and urinary abnormality. If the cause is fibroids, symptoms may include heavy bleeding, pain in the pelvis or lower back, and swelling or enlargement of the abdomen.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Fibroids (tumors in the uterus) can grow large, cause abdominal pain and swelling, and lead to recurring bleeding and anemia. Cancer can cause pain and lead to death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Cervical cancer is caused by a sexually transmitted infection called human papillomavirus (HPV), which can often occur alongside an HIV infection. As a result, cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among African women in areas of high HIV prevalence. Cervical cancer is also more prevalent in Africa than in the United States due to the lack of early-detection screening programs. The other conditions treated by a total abdominal hysterectomy are not necessarily more common in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient first reports for laboratory testing. The following day, the patient undergoes surgery. After the operation, the patient stays in the hospital ward for three to four days, during which time she is continually monitored. The surgery is considered successful if the wound heals without infection, bleeding, or fever, and if the patient no longer experiences urinary dysfunction.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of uterine fibroids or early-stage cancer, a total abdominal hysterectomy is curative.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If performed early enough, this surgery is low-risk and curative, with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

This surgery is available, but many patients cannot afford it. Many women are screened for cervical cancer with a low-cost alternative to a pap smear. This is common in HIV treatment programs. If necessary, the woman is referred for surgery, which she often cannot afford.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If cervical cancer is caught early enough, some minor procedures can solve the problem. Women with fibroids who still wish to have children may opt to undergo a surgery that only removes the fibroids, which is called a myomectomy.

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Samrach

Samrach is a 27-year-old clothing factory worker. He's is married with two small children. His daughter is six years old and just starting the first grade, and his son is nine months old. His wife is also a factory worker in their province. He likes to play with his children and listen to music. Ten months ago, on his way home from the factory, Samrach was in a motorcycle crash. He suffered fractures of the femur, clavicle, forearm, and multiple other injuries. He lost his left leg below the knee due to the trauma injury, and spent three months in a provincial hospital. A local taxi driver told him about the specialty care at our medical partner Children's Surgical Center (CSC). Doctors have diagnosed him with a brachial plexus injury on his left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. He cannot lift his left shoulder, bend his elbow, or use his hand. He feels unwell and shared that he often feels very depressed that he cannot work or support his family. Samrach traveled to our medical partner's care center to receive treatment. On January 6th, he will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, he hopes to regain the use of his arm so he can find work in the factory again. Our medical partner is requesting $696 to fund this life-changing procedure. Samrach said: "I hope this surgery will work for me, and I can start working again to have money to feed my children and make sure they go to school."

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Mercy

Mercy is a hardworking laborer and a widow. Her husband died 17 years ago when she was pregnant with her only child. The same year she gave birth to her son prematurely. She has worked hard to raise her son alone and he is currently in secondary school. Mercy doesn’t have a stable job, but engages in casual jobs within her village where she does cleaning to provide for her son. She likes being in the company of her son and they live in a small rented room in their small town. Around 17 years ago, Mercy began to experience troubling symptoms, including a neck swelling that developed when she gave birth to her son. She has had a difficult journey looking for treatment for her condition and has been to different hospitals where doctors have recommended surgery. She has never gotten the chance to have the surgery due to a lack of finances. Mercy has muscle weakness and gets fatigued easily. She was diagnosed with a multinodular goiter for which she reported to Kapsowar Hospital seeking support. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Mercy receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a thyroidectomy on January 12th at our medical partner's care center. Surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. This procedure will cost $936, and she and her family need help raising money. Mercy says, "I have lost weight, I am weak and cannot work like before. My hope in life is to get treated and continue supporting my son. He is the only family I got.”

39% funded

39%funded
$369raised
$567to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Samrach

Samrach is a 27-year-old clothing factory worker. He's is married with two small children. His daughter is six years old and just starting the first grade, and his son is nine months old. His wife is also a factory worker in their province. He likes to play with his children and listen to music. Ten months ago, on his way home from the factory, Samrach was in a motorcycle crash. He suffered fractures of the femur, clavicle, forearm, and multiple other injuries. He lost his left leg below the knee due to the trauma injury, and spent three months in a provincial hospital. A local taxi driver told him about the specialty care at our medical partner Children's Surgical Center (CSC). Doctors have diagnosed him with a brachial plexus injury on his left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. He cannot lift his left shoulder, bend his elbow, or use his hand. He feels unwell and shared that he often feels very depressed that he cannot work or support his family. Samrach traveled to our medical partner's care center to receive treatment. On January 6th, he will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, he hopes to regain the use of his arm so he can find work in the factory again. Our medical partner is requesting $696 to fund this life-changing procedure. Samrach said: "I hope this surgery will work for me, and I can start working again to have money to feed my children and make sure they go to school."

56% funded

56%funded
$390raised
$306to go