Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

They is a retired bamboo basket maker from Cambodia who needs $253 to fund cataract surgery so she can return to doing her daily activities without difficulty.

They
15%
  • $40 raised, $213 to go
$40
raised
$213
to go
Dedicate my donation


We'll send your dedicatee an email
about your gift, along with updates
about They's recovery.

August 9, 2022

They is a 63-year-old retired bamboo basket maker from Cambodia who enjoys listening to monks pray on the radio. She has two sons, two daughters, and five grandchildren. She currently lives alone near her children and is supported by them.

Two years ago, They developed a cataract in her right eye, causing her to experience eye tearing, itchiness, and blurry vision. She has difficulty seeing things clearly, including colors and faces, and is worried about falling when walking, so she is not able to go places on her own.

When They learned about our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, she traveled for three and a half hours seeking treatment. On August 9th, doctors will perform cataract surgery and place an intraocular lens implant in her right eye. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help funding this $253 procedure.

They says, “I hope after surgery my eye can see clearly so I can visit the pagoda by myself, see my relatives, and do housework well.”

They is a 63-year-old retired bamboo basket maker from Cambodia who enjoys listening to monks pray on the radio. She has two sons, two daugh...

Read more

They's Timeline

  • August 9, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    They was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • August 9, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    They was scheduled to receive treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 9, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    They's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    They is currently raising funds for her treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting They's treatment update from Children's Surgical Centre.

Funded by 3 donors

Profile 48x48 10714363 739039089511249 3116632349941804854 o

Funded by 3 donors

Profile 48x48 10714363 739039089511249 3116632349941804854 o
Treatment
Cataract - One Eye
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $253 for They's treatment
Hospital Fees
$36
Medical Staff
$174
Medication
$0
Supplies
$43
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients with cataracts experience decreased vision, discomfort, and irritation. Cataracts occur when the lens inside the eye becomes cloudy, causing functional blindness. These changes in the lens commonly occur with increasing age and therefore affect elderly people. Cataracts can also be congenital or traumatic.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The decreased vision from cataracts can cause functional blindness. This makes it difficult for the patient to conduct daily activities. Patients often need a family member to help guide and care for them. If the patient is elderly, this often affects a young child in the family. When a grandmother needs help getting around, a young child is often assigned to help with her daily tasks. That child cannot go to school.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In many countries in the developing world, surgical services are inadequate. Cataracts remain the leading cause of blindness globally. Even where surgical services are available, barriers to surgery remain, including cost, shortage of human resources, poor infrastructure, and limited awareness about access to available services.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Cataract surgery is the most common surgery performed worldwide. Surgeons remove the cloudy lens and place a clear lens implant in its place.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

A patient's vision can improve to 20/20 within one day after the surgery.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Cataract surgery is highly effective and carries a low risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Cataract surgery is available in most areas of Cambodia. However, free surgery is not as widely available.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Some debilitating effects of cataracts can be improved with glasses. When the cataract becomes mature, however, the only definitive treatment is surgical.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Snow

Snow is a 20-year-old woman who likes to play volleyball and the violin, listen to music, and weave traditional Karen clothes for herself. She currently lives with 36 other female students in her school’s dormitory, which is located in Burma. Originally from Mae La Oon Refugee Camp in Thailand, where her family still lives, she moved to the dormitory to study Women’s Leadership and Management at the beginning of this year. At the dormitory and school run by Karen Women’s Organization (KWO), she receives free food, tuition, and accommodations. Although she does not have a source of income, all of her basic needs are covered by KWO. After she graduates in April 2023, Snow plans to work with KWO for two years before moving back to the refugee camp to live with her family. This past June, Snow woke up feeling bloated in her abdominal area. A few days later, she also began experiencing pain in her lower left abdomen. After notifying a teacher, she was brought in to the free clinic, where she received an ultrasound and was informed that she has a cyst located on the left side of her lower abdomen. The medic notified her teacher that Snow would need to go across the border to Thailand to visit our medical partner's care center, Mae Sariang Hospital, for further investigation. When Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) was finally able to arrange transportation for Snow, she arrived at a KDHW safe house in Mae Sariang on August 1st. She visited Mae Sariang Hospital with a KDHW staff member the following day. After receiving an ultrasound and a blood test, Snow was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst on her left ovary. The doctor told her that she would need to undergo surgery to remove her left ovary. She may also require a partial hysterectomy, which is a procedure to remove the uterus, since the cyst is very large. However, they will only remove her uterus if absolutely necessary since they want to ensure she has the ability to have children in the future if she chooses to. Since Snow does not have a source of income, she is not able to fund her needed treatment on her own. Fortunately, KDHW staff referred her to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for assistance in accessing further treatment. Snow is now scheduled to undergo an oophorectomy, the surgical removal of one or both of the ovaries, on August 10th. BCMF is requesting $1,005 to fund her needed surgery and care. Snow has had to take time off from her studies to seek medical care, but she plans to resume once she receives treatment. She shares that both she and her family have been worried since they learned that she will need surgery. Snow says, “I am worried about my condition, and I am worried that I will not recover. I have never been sick before, which makes me feel stressed about my condition.”

71% funded

71%funded
$716raised
$289to go
Eliana

Eliana is a friendly and talkative young girl from Tanzania. She is the firstborn child in a family of three. Her parents both work as small-scale farmers, and they depend entirely on what they harvest for their daily living. When Eliana was two years old, her parents noticed that her left leg was swelling up and that she would limp when walking. They initially thought she had fallen and hurt herself, so they took her to a local dispensary, where she was prescribed pain relieving medication. Eliana was eventually diagnosed with genu valgus, which is a malalignment of the knees. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, Eliana struggles to stand and cannot walk more than four steps without either experiencing pain or falling down. This has resulted in her having to crawl most of the time in order to move from one place to another. In 2020, Eliana had corrective osteotomy surgery, which fortunately helped correct her legs to a point where she can now enjoy walking and playing with other children. However, she requires a second-stage procedure in order to remove her implant so her condition can heal entirely. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Eliana. The procedure is scheduled to take place on August 11th. Treatment will allow Eliana's legs to completely heal, fully restoring her mobility, and greatly decreasing her risk of future complications. Eliana’s grandmother says, “The first surgery my granddaughter got helped ease her walking. I believe this next surgery will make her legs even better.’’

35% funded

35%funded
$315raised
$565to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Snow

Snow is a 20-year-old woman who likes to play volleyball and the violin, listen to music, and weave traditional Karen clothes for herself. She currently lives with 36 other female students in her school’s dormitory, which is located in Burma. Originally from Mae La Oon Refugee Camp in Thailand, where her family still lives, she moved to the dormitory to study Women’s Leadership and Management at the beginning of this year. At the dormitory and school run by Karen Women’s Organization (KWO), she receives free food, tuition, and accommodations. Although she does not have a source of income, all of her basic needs are covered by KWO. After she graduates in April 2023, Snow plans to work with KWO for two years before moving back to the refugee camp to live with her family. This past June, Snow woke up feeling bloated in her abdominal area. A few days later, she also began experiencing pain in her lower left abdomen. After notifying a teacher, she was brought in to the free clinic, where she received an ultrasound and was informed that she has a cyst located on the left side of her lower abdomen. The medic notified her teacher that Snow would need to go across the border to Thailand to visit our medical partner's care center, Mae Sariang Hospital, for further investigation. When Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) was finally able to arrange transportation for Snow, she arrived at a KDHW safe house in Mae Sariang on August 1st. She visited Mae Sariang Hospital with a KDHW staff member the following day. After receiving an ultrasound and a blood test, Snow was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst on her left ovary. The doctor told her that she would need to undergo surgery to remove her left ovary. She may also require a partial hysterectomy, which is a procedure to remove the uterus, since the cyst is very large. However, they will only remove her uterus if absolutely necessary since they want to ensure she has the ability to have children in the future if she chooses to. Since Snow does not have a source of income, she is not able to fund her needed treatment on her own. Fortunately, KDHW staff referred her to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for assistance in accessing further treatment. Snow is now scheduled to undergo an oophorectomy, the surgical removal of one or both of the ovaries, on August 10th. BCMF is requesting $1,005 to fund her needed surgery and care. Snow has had to take time off from her studies to seek medical care, but she plans to resume once she receives treatment. She shares that both she and her family have been worried since they learned that she will need surgery. Snow says, “I am worried about my condition, and I am worried that I will not recover. I have never been sick before, which makes me feel stressed about my condition.”

71% funded

71%funded
$716raised
$289to go