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Josiah from Kenya raised $684 to fund a hernia operation.

Josiah
100%
  • $684 raised, $0 to go
$684
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Josiah's treatment was fully funded on June 16, 2022.
June 16, 2022

Josiah did not undergo a hernia operation.

Our medical partner just shared an update with us that Josiah’s surgery was canceled and we wanted to let you know right away. He was referred from another facility for treatment for a hernia, but upon his pre-operative review, the surgeon identified other indicators that he needs a change in treatment plans that will not require surgery at this time. Josiah was grateful for the offer of support from our community and our medical partner has asked that we support another patient in need of care right now.

Our medical partner just shared an update with us that Josiah's surgery was canceled and we wanted to let you know right away. He was referr...

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May 18, 2022

Josiah is a laborer who gets work whenever he can at local construction sites. He also works as an artisan in the jua kali sector (informal economy). His wife also works as a casual laborer, washing clothes for a living. They live in their ancestral home in the outskirts of the capital city of Nairobi.

Josiah has pain and swelling that has lasted for a week now, and is preventing him from working. When the pain medication prescribed for him didn’t work, an ultrasound and CT scan revealed a right inguinal-scrotal hernia and surgery is needed to heal.

Fortunately, on May 18th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at our medical partner’s care center. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $684 to fund Josiah’s surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently.

Josiah says, “This condition is embarrassing and I have not been able to talk to about it. But it is worsening and affecting my lifestyle. I have no choice but to seek help. Sadly, I am also unable to afford the cost of the treatment.”

Josiah is a laborer who gets work whenever he can at local construction sites. He also works as an artisan in the jua kali sector (informal ...

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Josiah's Timeline

  • May 18, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Josiah was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • May 18, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Josiah was scheduled to receive treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 23, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Josiah's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 16, 2022
    FUNDING ENDED

    Josiah is no longer raising funds.

  • June 16, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Josiah's treatment did not happen. Read the update.

Funded by 7 donors

Funded by 7 donors

Treatment
Hernia
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $684 for Josiah's treatment
Hospital Fees
$562
Medical Staff
$30
Medication
$25
Supplies
$56
Labs
$11
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A hernia occurs when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the lower abdominal wall, usually for one of two reasons. The first is a congenital abnormality in which the tissues did not close. The second is excessive stress in an adult, often due to heavy physical labor or pregnancy. Patients experience a bulge or lump in the affected area. The hernia may cause the patient to feel pain, discomfort, weakness, pressure, and sensations of heaviness or aching. These symptoms are often exacerbated when the patient coughs, bends over, or lifts heavy objects. In some cases, hernias have no symptoms and are only detected during routine medical exams.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients with uncomplicated hernias may experience only annoyance or discomfort. As the hernia opening expands, the discomfort will increase. Small openings are more likely to trap the intestine, potentially leading to intestinal damage or death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hernias are common in Africa. People often do very hard physical labor and lift heavy objects. Women tend to have more children than those in the United States. It is possible that some hernias have infectious or genetic causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts for three to eight hours, depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient will stay in the hospital anywhere from two days to eight weeks, again depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment is curative. The chance of intestinal strangulation or bowel obstruction reduces significantly.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Hernia repair is not a risky procedure, and it comes with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many patients will ignore a hernia until it becomes uncomfortable and seek care at that time. Some people will wear tighter pants or a tight band around the waist to prevent the intestine from protruding.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If the hernia is not “stuck,” patients tend to ignore it and adapt to living with it. However, this could lead to future complications.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Shee

Shee is a 23-year-old woman from Burma. In 2016, Shee and her family moved to a refugee camp in Thailand. There she has been able to continue her studies. Shee graduated from the junior college and now helps her cousin-in-law weave and sell traditional Karen clothes. She shared that it has been difficult for her family to find work within the camp at this time, but she hopes to become a teacher soon. In her free time, Shee enjoys playing with her nephews. In February, Shee began to develop a mass and experience pain in her abdomen, so she visited the camp's hospital. Upon review, she was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and given medication. Since the mass continued to grow, Shee was referred to her our medical partner's hospital, Mae Sariang Hospital, in early April. After receiving an ultrasound, the doctors determined Shee has an ovarian cyst and needs to undergo surgery to heal. Currently, Shee experiences severe pain that makes it challenging for her to sleep, eat, or continue her weaving. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), can help Shee receive treatment. On April 20th, she will undergo surgery to remove the cyst. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund the total cost of this procedure. Shee shared, "I am not worried about my operation because I hope it will fix my health problem. I would like to become a teacher in the future because I like teaching. After I recover, I plan to apply at a school in the refugee camp."

66% funded

66%funded
$1,004raised
$496to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.