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Success! Bitwire from Uganda raised $219 to fund a hysterectomy.

Bitwire
100%
  • $219 raised, $0 to go
$219
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Bitwire's treatment was fully funded on December 1, 2020.

Photo of Bitwire post-operation

December 6, 2020

Bitwire underwent a hysterectomy.

Bitwire had a successful hysterectomy treatment to cure her recurrent endometritis. She has peace of mind now as she no longer feels pain as before. She has started moving well and the medical team expects her to get even better as she recovers completely from her surgery. She is happy to know she will live a better life now.

Bitwire says, “I thank you so much for making me feel special among others who had their money for surgery. Thanks for saving my life. I plan to continue with my farming now to support my family.”

Bitwire had a successful hysterectomy treatment to cure her recurrent endometritis. She has peace of mind now as she no longer feels pain as...

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October 5, 2020

Bitwire is an older woman hailing from Kasozi in south-western Uganda. She came to the hospital with lower abdominal pain, bleeding, and other gynecological complications. This has affected her daily lifestyle for more than two years.

Bitwire has sought treatment in several facilities, including a regional government hospital, but due to a long waitlist, she could not receive timely care. She came to Nyakibale Hospital and was diagnosed with chronic pelvic pain due to recurrent endometritis and doctors recommend a total abdominal hysterectomy. If treated, she will be out of risk of further endometritis complications and her persistent pain.

Bitwire is a 65-year-old widow and a mother of three children. She tends to her banana plantation to make ends meet. However, the earnings are quite limited to meet her basic needs and the cost of surgery. She appeals for help.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $219 to fund Bitwire’s surgery. On October 6th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner’s care center. Once recovered, Bitwire will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain.

Bitwire says: “I will be glad to have my condition treated under your support because I have failed to manage on my own. I hope to continue with farming so as to provide for my grandchildren because I am their only caretaker.”

Bitwire is an older woman hailing from Kasozi in south-western Uganda. She came to the hospital with lower abdominal pain, bleeding, and oth...

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Bitwire's Timeline

  • October 5, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Bitwire was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • October 6, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Bitwire's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 8, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Bitwire received treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 1, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Bitwire's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 6, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Bitwire's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 another picture

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 another picture
Treatment
Total Abdominal Hysterectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $219 for Bitwire's treatment
Hospital Fees
$126
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$17
Supplies
$59
Labs
$6
Other
$11
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms vary depending on the condition that requires the total abdominal hysterectomy. If the cause is cervical, uterine, or ovarian cancer, there may not be symptoms, especially if the cancer is early-stage. In more advanced cases of cervical and uterine cancers, abnormal bleeding, unusual discharge, and pelvic or abdominal pain can occur. Symptoms of ovarian cancer may include trouble eating, trouble feeling full, bloating, and urinary abnormality. If the cause is fibroids, symptoms may include heavy bleeding, pain in the pelvis or lower back, and swelling or enlargement of the abdomen.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Fibroids (tumors in the uterus) can grow large, cause abdominal pain and swelling, and lead to recurring bleeding and anemia. Cancer can cause pain and lead to death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Cervical cancer is caused by a sexually transmitted infection called human papillomavirus (HPV), which can often occur alongside an HIV infection. As a result, cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among African women in areas of high HIV prevalence. Cervical cancer is also more prevalent in Africa than in the United States due to the lack of early-detection screening programs. The other conditions treated by a total abdominal hysterectomy are not necessarily more common in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient first reports for laboratory testing. The following day, the patient undergoes surgery. After the operation, the patient stays in the hospital ward for three to four days, during which time she is continually monitored. The surgery is considered successful if the wound heals without infection, bleeding, or fever, and if the patient no longer experiences urinary dysfunction.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of uterine fibroids or early-stage cancer, a total abdominal hysterectomy is curative.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If performed early enough, this surgery is low-risk and curative, with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

This surgery is available, but many patients cannot afford it. Many women are screened for cervical cancer with a low-cost alternative to a pap smear. This is common in HIV treatment programs. If necessary, the woman is referred for surgery, which she often cannot afford.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If cervical cancer is caught early enough, some minor procedures can solve the problem. Women with fibroids who still wish to have children may opt to undergo a surgery that only removes the fibroids, which is called a myomectomy.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Joseph

Joseph is a 59-year-old who relocated from his homeland to Kenya, where he has been for over 20 years. Joseph is a father to one child. His wife left their family many years ago. Currently, Joseph works as a day laborer and is especially well known for his tree cutting skills. He and his son stay with a family on their farm, where he often works. Several days ago, Joseph experienced an extremely painful accident. He fell from a tree when he was cutting tree branches. As a result, Joseph sustained multiple severe injuries, including multiple left rib fractures with a pneumothorax, and a closed intertrochanteric femur fracture on his right leg. He was rushed to our medical partner's care center Kapsowar Hospital, where he received emergency care and a chest tube was inserted to drain fluids surrounding his lungs caused by the impact of the incident. Since his admission, his condition has improved. Joseph was also put on traction to restore and maintain straight alignment and length of the fractured bone. Joseph is still bedridden and in pain, and is not able to walk and work. Despite this, he is optimistic that he will recover soon with proper treatment. Joseph requires funding for the fixation of his fracture to facilitate a full recovery. He is unable to raise any amount for his surgery, and appeals for financial support. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On April 27th, Joseph will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will help Joseph recover from his pain and restore his mobility, allowing him to return to walking and working. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,016 to fund his procedure. Joseph shared, “My hope is to be healed and be on my feet again so that I can continue with my daily duties."

92% funded

92%funded
$935raised
$81to go
Mu Hee

Mu Hee is a 23-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her parents, older brother, sister in-law, three nephews and three nieces in a refugee camp. Mu Hee’s older brother is the sole income earner in their family. He works as a nurse in the camp’s hospital, which is run by International Rescue Committee (IRC). Mu Hee’s parents and her sister in-law look after the household chores. Mu Hee’s nieces and nephews are students and Mu Hee is a Bible school student. Since the outbreak of Covid-19 in March 2020, she has been studying online in the refugee camp. Her teachers support her school fees and food. In her free time, Mu Hee likes to play with her nieces and nephews. She also loves to listen to music and sing. When Mu Hee was 14 years old, she began to experience severe abdominal pain. The first time it occurred, her father called a medic who lived close to their house, and the medic gave her an injection. She felt better after the injection, but continued to feel unwell every month. When she was 15, her father took her to the clinic in the camp to check whether Mu Hee had a serious illness in her abdomen, but the medic could not find any problem. Mu Hee's pain continued and she continued to receive treatment to help, but she did not think that her condition was serious because she had heard from her friends that some women experienced pain during the first day of their period. In early 2020, Mu Hee spoke about this condition with a staff member from a nearby clinic and with one of her teachers. Both urged her to get a check-up, and in February 2020, Mu Hee went to a clinic and a medic found a mass in her left ovary. Doctors have tried to treat her with medications for almost a year, but the mass has continued to grow. During a follow-up appointment in January 2021, the doctor told her that she would need surgery. Recently, Mu Hee has experienced pain in the left side of her lower abdomen almost every day. The pain is on and off and she feels most uncomfortable when running or walking, especially over long distances. She also experiences some pain as she does other basic daily tasks. Mu Hee sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. She is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery, and she is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Mu Hee said, “The first time when I heard that I have a mass in my ovary, I felt very sad. I am also worried that the mass might be cancerous. I think about my condition very often, but my parents are very supportive, and they encourage me not to be afraid. I believe that I will no longer experience pain after surgery.”

86% funded

86%funded
$1,293raised
$207to go
Samuel

Samuel is a 53-year-old fisherman. He is a father of two children aged 18 and 16 years old. He separated from his wife 5 years ago, and has been taking care of the children since the separation. In December 2020, Samuel was pricked by a poisonous thorn on his foot, which left a wound running from his foot to ankle that has become severely infected. He is in pain and unable to walk comfortably. The wound threatens his mobility and could result in amputation if not urgently attended to. Initially, Samuel tried treating the wound with herbs, but there was no improvement. He visited a nearby mission facility for a checkup and dressing, where doctors treated and washed the wound, but it continued to worsen. On April 1st, Samuel was driven by a well-wisher to our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital and upon review, doctors recommended an urgent debridement and skin grafting surgery. However, the cost of care is difficult for Samuel to afford. He had been depending on support from the local missionaries to pay for his previous medical bills and medication. Samuel appeals for financial support. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Samuel receive treatment. On April 2nd, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to clean off the wound and prevent further infection. Now, Samuel needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Samuel shared, “This wound is worsening by the day. I currently limp but I might lose the leg if I don’t get some surgical intervention. My fishing venture cannot even pay for the surgery.”

82% funded

82%funded
$978raised
$207to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Joseph

Joseph is a 59-year-old who relocated from his homeland to Kenya, where he has been for over 20 years. Joseph is a father to one child. His wife left their family many years ago. Currently, Joseph works as a day laborer and is especially well known for his tree cutting skills. He and his son stay with a family on their farm, where he often works. Several days ago, Joseph experienced an extremely painful accident. He fell from a tree when he was cutting tree branches. As a result, Joseph sustained multiple severe injuries, including multiple left rib fractures with a pneumothorax, and a closed intertrochanteric femur fracture on his right leg. He was rushed to our medical partner's care center Kapsowar Hospital, where he received emergency care and a chest tube was inserted to drain fluids surrounding his lungs caused by the impact of the incident. Since his admission, his condition has improved. Joseph was also put on traction to restore and maintain straight alignment and length of the fractured bone. Joseph is still bedridden and in pain, and is not able to walk and work. Despite this, he is optimistic that he will recover soon with proper treatment. Joseph requires funding for the fixation of his fracture to facilitate a full recovery. He is unable to raise any amount for his surgery, and appeals for financial support. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On April 27th, Joseph will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will help Joseph recover from his pain and restore his mobility, allowing him to return to walking and working. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,016 to fund his procedure. Joseph shared, “My hope is to be healed and be on my feet again so that I can continue with my daily duties."

92% funded

92%funded
$935raised
$81to go