Meet another patient

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Success! Friday from Uganda raised $297 to fund ovarian surgery.

Friday
100%
  • $297 raised, $0 to go
$297
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Friday's treatment was fully funded on June 1, 2020.

Photo of Friday post-operation

June 3, 2020

Friday underwent ovarian surgery.

After the surgery, Friday looked weak and in pain, especially on her surgery incision site. The next day, the incision site was clean, dry, and healing very well with minimal tenderness. The following day, she shared that she had no complaints, which was very encouraging. Finally, she was requested to stay for another day as she made her personal arrangements to return home to finish healing. She hopes to finally resume her small-scale farming to be able to support her own family.

Friday shared, “God works through generous people, groups, and organizations; thanks to the Watsi program for restoring my lost hope. I was helpless and stranded, may you live longer to help more needy people worldwide. After recovery, I will resume small-scale farming as it is the main source of my family’s income and support.”

After the surgery, Friday looked weak and in pain, especially on her surgery incision site. The next day, the incision site was clean, dry, ...

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May 19, 2020

Friday is a widow and a mother of three. She arrived at the hospital with two months’ history of pelvic pain associated with difficulty in movement and loss of weight. She is in severe pain with right and left iliac masses of different measurements. Doctors completed scans/tests and she was diagnosed with ovarian masses. If not treated through curative laparotomy, Friday will not be able to do her work due to severe pain, and her pelvic masses may develop into carcinomas.

Friday is a small-scale farmer who grows beans and potatoes for home consumption. Her husband died in 2011 and left her with two children. One is now 15 years old and in primary school class six and another one who is 9 years old is in primary school class five. She later had another child who is 5 years old and in preschool.

Friday managed to construct a two-room semi-permanent house to shelter her family, and is on her own to raise her children. She gets their school fees through selling part of what she produces from farming, but cannot afford additional surgery charges.

Friday shared with us, “I had planned to stop my children from going to school because I cannot afford their school fees in my condition. Given the opportunity with the surgery, I look forward to resuming farming to be able to take care of my children.”

Friday is a widow and a mother of three. She arrived at the hospital with two months’ history of pelvic pain associated with difficulty in m...

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Friday's Timeline

  • May 19, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Friday was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • May 20, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Friday received treatment at Rushoroza Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 20, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Friday's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 01, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Friday's treatment was fully funded.

  • June 03, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Friday's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 2 donors

Funded by 2 donors

Treatment
Curative Laporotomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $297 for Friday's treatment
Hospital Fees
$206
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$25
Supplies
$46
Labs
$20
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The symptoms would vary depending on the condition being treated. Most curative laparotomies are done for tumors or infections. Patients will have pain, weight loss, fever, and abdominal fullness. A curative laparotomy could address a range of abdominal conditions, such as an ovarian tumor, stomach cancer, liver cancer, cholecystitis, abscess, and others.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

It depends on the nature of the condition, but most curative laparotomies at Watsi's Medical Partner AMH Care Centers are done for tumors or infections. Patients will have pain, weight loss, fever, and abdominal fullness.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Dependent on the exact condition. Stomach ulcers, ovarian tumors, and cancer are increasingly becoming common in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts around three hours with the patient being discharged home after 3 days. They are continuously monitored in the hospital wards.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The procedure is done with the intent of removing the pathology and curing the condition.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Medium surgical risk, overall, the risk of surgery is less than the risk of doing nothing. If the condition is cancer and caught early enough, it is treatable. If the condition is benign, such as cholecystitis, then the laparotomy is curative.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality hospitals with adequate resources and expertise to treat most of the conditions that could be diagnosed by a laparotomy.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For most abdominal tumors there is no alternative to removing them.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Nay

Nay is an eight-year-old boy from Thailand. He lives with his parents and two older sister in in a village in Tak Province. Nay’s mother and his eldest sister work at a sock factory. They receive food and accommodation in addition to a combined monthly income of around 7,000 baht (approx. $234 USD) per month. Nay and his other older sister are students at one of the migrant learning centers in their area, while his father is homemaker. This morning at around 11:00 am, Nay had finished writing his exam at school and was ready to go home. When he saw the school car that had come to bring the students back to their homes, he and some of the other students became excited about going back home. They rushed into the car before the car had come to a full stop. In the chaos, Nay fell out of the car and cried out that his leg is hurt. His teacher ran to help him up, but Nay told the teacher that he could not stand up and that his right leg was in pain. His teacher then arranged for a car to take him to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), where upon arrival the medic examined his leg and informed his teacher that Nay had broken his right femur. The medic also told the teacher that he would need to receive surgery at Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) to help his leg heal properly. Currently, Nay is in pain and he cannot move or lift his right leg. He can only lay down and complains that his leg is in pain. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Nay will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for March 3rd and will cost $1,500. He will be able to move his leg and walk again after surgery. He will also no longer be in pain.

78% funded

78%funded
$1,183raised
$317to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Nay

Nay is an eight-year-old boy from Thailand. He lives with his parents and two older sister in in a village in Tak Province. Nay’s mother and his eldest sister work at a sock factory. They receive food and accommodation in addition to a combined monthly income of around 7,000 baht (approx. $234 USD) per month. Nay and his other older sister are students at one of the migrant learning centers in their area, while his father is homemaker. This morning at around 11:00 am, Nay had finished writing his exam at school and was ready to go home. When he saw the school car that had come to bring the students back to their homes, he and some of the other students became excited about going back home. They rushed into the car before the car had come to a full stop. In the chaos, Nay fell out of the car and cried out that his leg is hurt. His teacher ran to help him up, but Nay told the teacher that he could not stand up and that his right leg was in pain. His teacher then arranged for a car to take him to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), where upon arrival the medic examined his leg and informed his teacher that Nay had broken his right femur. The medic also told the teacher that he would need to receive surgery at Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) to help his leg heal properly. Currently, Nay is in pain and he cannot move or lift his right leg. He can only lay down and complains that his leg is in pain. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Nay will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for March 3rd and will cost $1,500. He will be able to move his leg and walk again after surgery. He will also no longer be in pain.

78% funded

78%funded
$1,183raised
$317to go