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Nkamweha from Uganda raised $267 to fund an amputation for his infected leg.

Nkamweha
100%
  • $267 raised, $0 to go
$267
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Nkamweha's treatment was fully funded on July 5, 2020.

Photo of Nkamweha post-operation

July 10, 2020

Nkamweha underwent surgery for his infected leg.

Nkamweha was prepared for a major amputation due to chronic osteomyelitis of his left leg. We are happy to share that during the operation the surgeon determined that his left knee joint could be spared because the abscess and infection was found to not be as significant as expected. The medical team determined that a sequestrectomy was a better treatment option. Through this treatment, he will now be able to walk and not go through the same challenges. He had lost hope of walking on two legs again and is now happy and progressing with minimal complaints. He will be visiting the hospital for follow up as planned with his doctor.

Nkamweha says, “I thank everybody who has contributed knowledge, money, and anything towards the success of my surgery, I had given up my leg, but I give thanks to my doctors. I received quality services at Rushoroza and may God bless everyone. I plan to return to charcoal making as soon as possible to be able to earn a living once again and not be a burden to my family anymore.”

Nkamweha was prepared for a major amputation due to chronic osteomyelitis of his left leg. We are happy to share that during the operation t...

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June 15, 2020

Nkamweha used to be a charcoal maker and was able to earn a living through selling charcoal. Due to his health condition, he has been seated at home in severe pain for the past seven years and unable to earn an income. His wife is a small scale farmer who grows beans and potatoes for their family to eat. They have 4 children, aged 23-11 years old and live in a three-room semi-permanent house for shelter.

Nkamweha started feeling pain in his leg below the knee in November 2013, and his pain gradually increased with time. In December 2013, he went to Kabale Regional Hospital to seek medical attention. He stayed in the hospital for three weeks. While at the hospital, he was given injections and his leg became swollen and he was feeling severe pain. Their treatment helped and he was finally discharged home. In August 2014, he returned to the same hospital in similar conditions and similar processes occurred and was discharged home again after one month. He was still in severe pain. In August 2019, he went back to the same hospital again for one month, resulting in the same story. He has decided to come to Rushoroza hospital to seek out treatment where the surgeons found that if not treated through an amputation, he could develop pathological fractures and deformity of the limb, septicemia and inability to use the limb.

Their family has no external support from relatives and friends and are seeking financial support for the surgery.

Nkamweha says, “Without this pain, I believe I can do something developmental for my family. I would be able to restart my business, even if it is just to personally supervise the activities while using walking sticks.”

Nkamweha used to be a charcoal maker and was able to earn a living through selling charcoal. Due to his health condition, he has been seated...

Read more

Nkamweha's Timeline

  • June 15, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Nkamweha was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • June 16, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Nkamweha's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 18, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Nkamweha received treatment at Rushoroza Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • July 05, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Nkamweha's treatment was fully funded.

  • July 10, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    We received an update on Nkamweha. Read the update.

Funded by 1 donor

Funded by 1 donor

Treatment
Major Amputation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $267 for Nkamweha's treatment
Hospital Fees
$173
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$25
Supplies
$49
Labs
$20
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms include: inability/difficulty in walking, severe pain, serious infection, non-healing ulcer. Amputation may be required for a large number of reasons, including trauma with irreversible or life-threatening damage to the limb; infection; snakebite; cancer or tumour; diabetes; damage to the blood vessels.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If a person has such a severe condition of the leg, then they will not be able to walk alone, work, study, or support their families. And the condition could be deadly if the amputation is not done.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

It happen because often conditions which could have been treated earlier were not attended to because of lack of access to medical services in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Please refer to the AMH treatment process document.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Life-saving in the presence of infection, dead limb, or cancer. If the leg is useless or painful, then removing it will allow placement of a prosthesis (accounted for in the cost) and an increase in functional status.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Very treatable if caught in time. An amputation is not considered a high-risk surgical procedure. Any other diseases (like HIV or diabetes) will need to be treated at the same time.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Access to surgeons who can safely and cleanly perform amputations is not common. Patients will often go to traditional healers or small dispensaries receiving ineffective treatments before arriving at an equipped hospital.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If there is an infection or cancer, medicines (or radiation for cancer) may halt the disease. But usually by the time the patient has been referred to the surgeon it is too late.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.