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Atwijukire from Uganda raised $187 to fund a mass removal procedure.

Atwijukire
100%
  • $187 raised, $0 to go
$187
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Atwijukire's treatment was fully funded on March 26, 2019.
March 29, 2019

Atwijukire did not receive treatment as expected.

Her doctor decided that the nerves around the affected are not yet strong enough and may get damaged if surgery is performed. Her condition will be assessed again in one year.

Her doctor decided that the nerves around the affected are not yet strong enough and may get damaged if surgery is performed. Her condition ...

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March 12, 2019

Atwijukire is a child from Uganda. Her parents are small-scale farmers.

Atwijukire has had a swelling on her neck for six months. Her family traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On March 12, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Atwijukire’s family needs help to raise $187 to fund this procedure.

Her mother says, “I hope my daughter to be relieved of such condition and she gets good quality of life and I get peace of mind.”

Atwijukire is a child from Uganda. Her parents are small-scale farmers. Atwijukire has had a swelling on her neck for six months. Her fa...

Read more

Atwijukire's Timeline

  • March 12, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Atwijukire was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • March 12, 2019
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Atwijukire was scheduled to receive treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 12, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Atwijukire's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 29, 2019
    FUNDING ENDED

    Atwijukire is no longer raising funds.

  • March 29, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Atwijukire's treatment did not happen. Read the update.

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 anil

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 anil
Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $187 for Atwijukire's treatment
Hospital Fees
$96
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$29
Supplies
$28
Labs
$34
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of accessibility to treatment facilities, some of the patients have lived with masses for a long time. Access to medical facilities is difficult for people living in remote parts of Uganda.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is usually admitted for three days. They undergo three- to five-hour surgery depending on the location of the mass and whether it's cancerous. After surgery, they are continuously monitored in the wards.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Khin

Khin is a 39-year-old woman who lives with her family in Hpa-An Township, Karen State, Burma. Both her children are in preschool. She and her husband are subsistence farmers, growing rice during the rainy season on rented land. The rest of the year, her husband collects leaves used to make roofs, works as a daily labourer or collects branches to sell. Khin was born with a scar the size of an ant bite on her upper lip. Her parents thought that it would disappear or heal on its own but the scar developed into a growth and increased in size. Her parents passed away when she was young and after that she went to live with her brother’s family. By the time she was around 20 years old, the growth had become large and soft, covering the area between her upper lips and her nose. When the pain became unbearable in 2005, her uncle dropped her off at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Thailand, a free clinic close to where her uncle used to work. At this point, the growth had become so large that dragged her upper lip down and extended into her nostrils. At MTC, she was seen by doctors and medics, before she was diagnosed with a hemangioma. At this point, the growth had worsened, and she was bleeding from her lips. In April 2006, Khin went to Chiang Mai Hospital and had the hemangioma removed surgically. The growth later has returned. Overtime, the hemangioma has increased in size and become hard. It has now expanded into Khin’s nostrils, especially her left nostril, which causes her to have difficulty breathing at times. She feels uncomfortable but is not in pain. Sometimes she also feels like she has a blood clot in her nostrils during her nosebleeds. Because the nosebleed can start at any time and can last anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes, her life revolves around managing her nosebleeds. She is unable to work or sleep properly, and if she is about to have a nosebleed, she is unable to eat. The nosebleeds have also affected her ability to earn an income for her children and continues to impact her social life. “When I socialise, I do not feel comfortable and some people think I have a disease that I can infect them with,” said Khin. “So, I hope to get better after surgery, and I hope I will no longer have nosebleeds. I don’t want to bleed, and I want to socialise with my friends and family happily. [Right now] my friends won’t even touch me.”

91% funded

91%funded
$1,367raised
$133to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.