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Success! Zipporah from Kenya raised $748 to fund hearing treatment and devices.

Zipporah
100%
  • $748 raised, $0 to go
$748
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Zipporah's treatment was fully funded on May 11, 2021.

Photo of Zipporah post-operation

June 10, 2021

Zipporah underwent hearing treatment.

Zipporah finally got a hearing aid fitting and is doing fantastic! Her doctors indicated that the procedure was successful and all went on planned. She’ll not need any other surgery but they have asked her to return if she has any complications.

Zipporah says, “Thank YOU for the support and assistance with the fitting. I can now hear!”

Zipporah finally got a hearing aid fitting and is doing fantastic! Her doctors indicated that the procedure was successful and all went on p...

Read more
April 30, 2021

Zipporah is jovial and keeps smiling the whole time we are talking, shared our local Watsi rep. She delivered a happy baby one month ago and she says that her child is her source of encouragement.

For almost four years now she has not been able to use her right ear, a condition that has greatly affected her Mitumba business (second-hand clothes vending). She needs a hearing aid to boost hearing on her right side. She remembers it starting while she was working one day in June. She started hearing echoes on the right ear as she negotiated with her customers. It was slight at first but gradually worsened over time. She visited several health facilities seeking treatment but she never improved.

She finally opted to visit our Medical Partner’s Care Center Kijabe Hospital in December 2018 after being referred by a friend. She has been following-up for treatment, and recently doctors recommended that she gets fitted with a hearing aid. Her last visit to the hospital was in December last year and she has not been able to get the treatment and device due to financial strain.

Zipporah currently doesn’t have a source of income and is home taking care of her one-month-old baby. She had to stop her clothes business after she started having problems with her ear. Her husband works as a data entry clerk whose income is just enough to cover basics for their family. They live in a rental house costing $50 a month. They have national insurance for health but unfortunately it will not cover this treatment and hearing aid fitting.

Zipporah is jovial and keeps smiling the whole time we are talking, shared our local Watsi rep. She delivered a happy baby one month ago and...

Read more

Zipporah's Timeline

  • April 30, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Zipporah was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • May 3, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Zipporah received treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 5, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Zipporah's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • May 11, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Zipporah's treatment was fully funded.

  • June 10, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Zipporah's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 7 donors

Funded by 7 donors

Treatment
Hearing Aids - Moderate
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $748 for Zipporah's treatment
Hospital Fees
$572
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$0
Supplies
$37
Other
$139
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients who need hearing aids present with a variety of conditions, including cholesteatoma, conductive hearing loss, ear drainage, sensorineural hearing loss, otitis media-inflammation of the middle ear, or a perforated ear drum/tear in the ear drum. Patients are unable to perceive speech and sounds, leading to impaired speech.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients are unable to perceive speech and sounds, they have impaired speech and language development, impaired communication, difficulties in learning, and avoidance/withdrawal from social situations.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The prevalence of disabling hearing loss in children and adults is greatest in Sub-Saharan Africa, south Asia and Asia Pacific. Certain infections (e.g. meningitis and ear infections) may cause hearing loss if not treated promptly.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Patients are fitted for hearing aids, which are electrical devices that assist in optimizing perception of speech and other sounds. They amplify sound and thus improve hearing. They are designed for hearing impaired individuals. A basic hearing aid consists of a microphone (collects sound energy), amplifier (increases amplitude of impulses collected), earphone/receiver (converts electrical energy into sound), battery (provides power supply), and mould (holds the hearing aid in place and acts like a seal and volume control). Generally, they can be categorized by technology and style. Selection depends on hearing loss, cosmetic appearance, and cost.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Patients will gain the ability to perceive speech and sounds, have improved speech and language development, improved learning ability, and active participation in social situations.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Not using the optimal hearing aid or not using it in the correct way could lead to uncomfortable side effects, including bad fitting, headaches and tinnitus (ringing in the ear), and improper sound level and quality. However, this can be easily avoided and fixed with the assistance of an audiologist.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality centers with the specialized personnel (audiologists and ENT doctors) that offer this kind of service, but the cost of hearing aids is a major deterrent for patients to access care.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For many hearing disorders, there is no actual available cure. However, there are assistive devices like hearing aids and promising new treatments that allow patients to manage their hearing disorders.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

John

John is very talkative and welcoming 46-year-old man. He arrived to the hospital with pain and distention for 3 days before admission to Kijabe Hospital this week. He had an x-ray and an endoscopy on the same day that revealed he has a Sigmoid Volvulus a condition in which the sigmoid colon wraps around itself, causing a closed-loop obstruction. This condition causes continued abdominal discomfort. He's now scheduled for a laparotomy and sigmoid colectomy to rectify the condition and needs financial support. Barely two weeks ago, John was very excited that he had found a job and was looking forward to his first day at work. Two days before he had to report to work, he noticed that he had not passed stool for some days. He started feeling uncomfortable but thought that he will be well soon enough. The day he was waiting for had arrived and he reported to work very happily but uncomfortable because his condition had worsened. He opened up to his immediate supervisor who advised him to go back home and seek medical attention. His supervisor went ahead to offer him some money to cater for the transport fee. John went to the terminus and boarded a matatu to head back home. Along the way, the pain worsened and was unbearable and he started vomiting. He requested the driver to drop him off at a nearby hospital. Luckily, the matatu was almost near our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital. The driver pulled over and helped him catch a taxi to Kijabe as fast as he could. He was admitted as an emergency case under the general surgery team. John is the father of six children, with his firstborn now 20 years old and married. Four of his children are in high school and the youngest is yet to join the school. Eight months ago, John lost his job as a security guard in a flower farm. After he was dismissed, he used the money he was given as service fees to buy a motorcycle, with which he started a bodaboda taxi business. His wife is involved in farming and mostly she sells the farm produce to supplement their family's earnings. John shared, “I feel sad for myself and my family because now I cannot do anything to provide for them as I am in hospital. I would really like to go back to work and earn enough for them.”

93% funded

93%funded
$573raised
$43to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.