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Success! Janet from Tanzania raised $838 to fund knee surgery.

Janet
100%
  • $838 raised, $0 to go
$838
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Janet's treatment was fully funded on September 16, 2020.

Photo of Janet post-operation

April 17, 2020

Janet underwent mobility-restoring knee surgery.

Janet had a successful surgery that has helped correct both of her legs that had formed knocked knees due to excessive fluoride in the water they consume. Due to her legs being deformed, she couldn’t walk for a long-distances, nor could she run. She would complain of pain after a short walk.

Janet has a full cast of both legs and she was able to start her ambulation in March. Her casting was removed in early April. She was admitted for treatment again after having diarrhoea and vomiting, but she is currently doing fine.

Janet’s mother says, “I am so grateful for all your help in helping correct my daughter’s legs. She is now doing well and going on well with exercises. Thank you once more and may God give you more.”

Janet had a successful surgery that has helped correct both of her legs that had formed knocked knees due to excessive fluoride in the water...

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February 27, 2020

Janet is a baby from Tanzania. She is the third born child in a family of three children. She is a cheerful and curious little girl. Janet’s parents own a small shop which sells small home stuffs.

Janet was diagnosed with genu valgus. Her legs bow inwards so that her knees touch. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, she can not walk without rubbing her knees together and this is causing her pain and discomfort.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $838 to fund corrective surgery for Janet. The procedure is scheduled to take place on February 28th. Treatment will hopefully restore Janet’s mobility, allow her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease her risk of future complications.

Janet’s mother says, “I see that my daughter has a problem with her legs, I do not understand much about her condition but it worries me that she may grow up and become disabled if I do not do anything. Please help my daughter.”

Janet is a baby from Tanzania. She is the third born child in a family of three children. She is a cheerful and curious little girl. Janet's...

Read more

Janet's Timeline

  • February 27, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Janet was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Tanzania.

  • February 27, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Janet's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • February 28, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Janet received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 17, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Janet's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • September 16, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Janet's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 21 donors

Funded by 21 donors

Treatment
Fluorosis - Genu Valgus / Varus
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $838 for Janet's treatment
Hospital Fees
$789
Medical Staff
$15
Medication
$11
Supplies
$0
Labs
$23
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients with genu valgum (or "knock-knees") have knees that bend inward and cause an abnormal walking gait. Patients with genu varum (or bowleggedness) have knees that bend outward and cause knee or hip pain and reduced range of motion in the hips.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The patient's mobility is hindered, which can prevent the patient from making a living through physical labor. The patient may also develop arthritis later in life.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In the United States, supplemental fluoride is added to the water to improve dental health. However, in areas of northern Tanzania, there is too much naturally-occurring fluoride in the water, which causes bone curvature.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient will stay in the hospital for 4-5 days. During this time, the surgical wound will be monitored for swelling and infection. The patient will complete physiotherapy to help him or her walk or move the limbs. A series of X-rays will be performed over several months to monitor the healing process.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joints will be aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This procedure is not risky, but it is time-consuming. The rehabilitation process can take several months.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. Most patients live in remote, rural areas and are identified through mobile outreach. The pediatric surgical program at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre was started to meet the large burden of pediatric disability in the region.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. Although some cases can heal on their own, the patients submitted to Watsi require dedicated treatment.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Rombadi

Rombadi is a 34-year-old man from Uganda. He came to Nyakibale Hospital with inguinal area swelling that has been persistent for over five years. He feels pain and discomfort whenever he walks for a long distance, or does anything strenuous. This has strained his daily work as a bodaboda operator in western Uganda. Rombadi had never been to the hospital before due to financial constraints. Fortunately, he was referred to our partner facility where he was diagnosed with a right inguinal hernia. He requires herniorrhaphy to improve his lifestyle and productivity, and reduce the chances of further complications such as strangulation and intestinal obstruction. Rombadi's work provides him and his family with limited income, making life's requirement hard to meet. His wife works on the farm to provide additional income for their family. He is a father of three and sometimes works on the farm as well especially when business is down. Rombadi is not able to meet the cost of surgery and he appeals for critical support. Fortunately, on May 5th, he will undergo a hernia repair surgery at our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $219 to fund Rombadi's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Rombadi says: “I hope that if all goes on well with my surgery, I will be able to continue with working to provide more to my family.”

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Agnes

Agnes, a mother of eight children, arrived in our Watsi reps' office looking frail, drained, and in deep thought. She had given up getting medical attention and had requested her children to take her home before we intervened. She is mourning her husband who recently succumbed to cancer. Furthermore, doctors recently discovered she has a high-grade stromal tumor and requires surgery to remove the ovarian mass, which has been causing her severe discomfort. She shared her story with us: during the first week of May 2020, Agnes started feeling a sharp pain in the lower part of her stomach. She thought they were just normal pains and therefore got pain medication from a nearby chemist. Days later, her pains continued to increase, this time accompanied by bleeding. Alarmed she visited the nearest health centre where she was referred to Kijabe Hospital for further review. Several tests were conducted when she visited the facility and doctors discovered that she has symptomatic uterine fibroids. She underwent surgery but later doctors discovered that she has a mass in her ovaries that requires excursion. Despite having approval from the National Health Insurance program, the amount is not enough to cover the cost of surgery and she needs financial assistance. Agnes was widowed barely a month ago after her husband's long battle to cancer. The cost of taking care of her husband has depleted the limited family resources they had. Equally, she has also been sick and had several trips that made her close the little shop they were running from their home. She has no source of income after they closed down their shop. Her kids don’t yet have a stable source of income, and with what they do have, they have been instrumental in paying for her husband’s medical bills and cost of the funeral. Agnes shared, “I recently buried my husband as a result of cancer. I have been ailing and in a lot of pain. I had to close my small shop and therefore have no source of income. I am unable to afford this much-needed surgery and request for assistance.”

53% funded

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$331raised
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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Rombadi

Rombadi is a 34-year-old man from Uganda. He came to Nyakibale Hospital with inguinal area swelling that has been persistent for over five years. He feels pain and discomfort whenever he walks for a long distance, or does anything strenuous. This has strained his daily work as a bodaboda operator in western Uganda. Rombadi had never been to the hospital before due to financial constraints. Fortunately, he was referred to our partner facility where he was diagnosed with a right inguinal hernia. He requires herniorrhaphy to improve his lifestyle and productivity, and reduce the chances of further complications such as strangulation and intestinal obstruction. Rombadi's work provides him and his family with limited income, making life's requirement hard to meet. His wife works on the farm to provide additional income for their family. He is a father of three and sometimes works on the farm as well especially when business is down. Rombadi is not able to meet the cost of surgery and he appeals for critical support. Fortunately, on May 5th, he will undergo a hernia repair surgery at our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $219 to fund Rombadi's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Rombadi says: “I hope that if all goes on well with my surgery, I will be able to continue with working to provide more to my family.”

11% funded

11%funded
$26raised
$193to go