Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Mey Ching is a sweet 7-year-old from Cambodia who needs $521 to fund limb deformity correction surgery to heal her legs.

Mey Ching
60%
  • $315 raised, $206 to go
$315
raised
$206
to go
Dedicate my donation


We'll send your dedicatee an email
about your gift, along with updates
about Mey Ching's recovery.

October 6, 2022

Mey Ching comes from Banteay Meanchey province in Cambodia. She lives with her parents - her father is a cook and her mother is a factory worker. She has a 15-year-old brother in grade seven and a 13-year-old sister in grade four. Mey Ching should be in second grade but is not currently in school because of her disability. She stays at home and likes to paint, watch TV and sit outside with her parents.

Since birth, Mey Ching has had a condition with both of her legs which have become increasingly bowing outward at her knees. She cannot walk far and is in pain when she does. This has prevented her from attending school and socializing with peers.

Mey Ching’s parents traveled eight hours to Children’s Surgical Centre for a diagnosis and treatment. Doctors have tentatively diagnosed her with a condition found in children that affects the growth plates around the knee. The disease causes the growth plate near the inside of the knee to either slow down or stop making new bone. She will need an operation to correct both of her bowing tibias. If not treated, it can lead to progressive deformities of her legs however surgical treatment will correct her bowed legs.

Mey Ching’s family needs help to pay for this $521 procedure at CSC to save their daughter from permanent disability.

Mey Ching’s mother said: “We are so worried that Mey Ching will never walk or attend school. We are hopeful that the doctors at CSC can fix her legs so she can go to school and play with friends.”

Mey Ching comes from Banteay Meanchey province in Cambodia. She lives with her parents - her father is a cook and her mother is a factory wo...

Read more

Mey Ching's Timeline

  • October 6, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Mey Ching was submitted by Ellen Interlandi, Volunteer at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • October 7, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Mey Ching was scheduled to receive treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 10, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Mey Ching's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Mey Ching is currently raising funds for her treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Mey Ching's treatment update from Children's Surgical Centre.

Funded by 8 donors

Funded by 8 donors

Treatment
Angular Limb Deformity Correction
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $521 for Mey Ching's treatment
Hospital Fees
$70
Medical Staff
$377
Medication
$0
Supplies
$66
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Genu varum, commonly known as bowleg, is marked by knees being apart when the patient is standing with feet together. While common in infants up to age 2-3 years, genu varum that persists beyond this point may require treatment. The most apparent symptom is an altered walking pattern. Bowleg can also cause discomfort in hip, knees, and ankles from the stress of the bowed leg.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Bowlegs range in severity and can be functional though uncomfortable. The early and abnormal stress from untreated genu varum in adulthood is associated with accelerated onset of arthritis and increased risk of medial meniscus tears.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Genu varum can be caused both by genetics and by vitamin and mineral deficiencies. In particular, rickets is a major cause of bone disease in children, resulting from insufficient calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Cambodia has high rates of malnutrition and essential vitamin deficiencies, which contribute to the risk of bowleg. In addition, treatment may not often be sought early, and with genu varum, early action may prevent the need for more invasive surgery in adolescents and adults.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The goal of surgical treatment for genu varum is to realign the legs. Depending on the age of the patient, treatment is generally either by guided growth or osteotomy. Guided growth (temporary hemiepiphysiodesis) is less invasive, and able to be performed on patients whose bones are still growing (around 14-16 years old). Under this procedure, a plate is inserted onto the lateral side of the growth plate of the bone, which guides the growth of the bones. Guided growth can also be done by stapling, which creates asymmetrical growth by compressing the physis. In patients who cannot have this surgery, an osteotomy is performed whereby the tibia is cut below the knee and a wedge-shaped graft is inserted to shift the pressure to the outside of the knee. Patients then need to protect and support the leg with a brace.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treating genu varum relieves the patient of any discomfort that may have been caused by the abnormal stress on knee and ankle joints, and reduces risk of early arthritis. Patients also no longer have the visual appearance of bowlegs.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks of a knee osteotomy include infection in the bone, failure of the graft to take, and injuries to surrounding nerves or blood vessels. Guided growth has fewer risks than osteotomy. However, patients undergoing guided growth need to be regularly checked, as the plates need to be removed at a specific time period to prevent overcorrection.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Surgical treatment in Cambodia can be expensive and hard to access. Patients will travel for hours by car, motocycle, and bus to receive free surgery at CSC.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

While braces and specially designed shoes exist as alternatives to surgery in growing children, these options are not well supported by the medical literature and may cause growth problems.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Kaptuya

Kaptuya is a widow and a happy mother of three sons and a daughter from the semi-arid area of Baringo County in Kenya. Her husband passed away some years back after a short illness. Kaptuya and her children live in a semi-permanent three room house on her late husband's piece of land in an area well known for insecurity and cattle rustling. During the rainy season, they plant maize and millet that sometimes yields enough for both her school-aged children, and for her to sell. Currently, the area is faced with drought and famine, so they depend on relief food from the government and from well-wishers due to the lack of rain experienced this year. Six months ago, Kaptuya applied for a job as a housekeeper at a nearby health center. She was happy knowing that she would earn some money, and that the facility would pay for her medical coverage, but unfortunately that did not happen. The salary was also inconsistent and, thus, unreliable. In 2013, when Kaptuya was expecting her last born, she developed a growth at her neck which gradually increased in size. Kaptuya began to experience troubling symptoms, including neck swelling, which is most visible on the right side. She currently experiences shortness of breath, especially at night, and she sleeps with difficulty. She also has a fast heart rate, and easily gets tired, which affects her daily duties. She was diagnosed with non-toxic goiter, or an irregular growth of the thyroid. She needs surgery to prevent her symptoms from getting worse. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Kaptuya receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a thyroidectomy on November 22nd. Surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. This procedure will cost $936, and she and her family need help raising money. Kaptuya says, “I am the only hope for my dear children. I live because of them, and my well-being keeps them going. I would like to get well so that I may continue working in order to support them to pursue their dreams. Please assist me.”

46% funded

46%funded
$433raised
$503to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Kaptuya

Kaptuya is a widow and a happy mother of three sons and a daughter from the semi-arid area of Baringo County in Kenya. Her husband passed away some years back after a short illness. Kaptuya and her children live in a semi-permanent three room house on her late husband's piece of land in an area well known for insecurity and cattle rustling. During the rainy season, they plant maize and millet that sometimes yields enough for both her school-aged children, and for her to sell. Currently, the area is faced with drought and famine, so they depend on relief food from the government and from well-wishers due to the lack of rain experienced this year. Six months ago, Kaptuya applied for a job as a housekeeper at a nearby health center. She was happy knowing that she would earn some money, and that the facility would pay for her medical coverage, but unfortunately that did not happen. The salary was also inconsistent and, thus, unreliable. In 2013, when Kaptuya was expecting her last born, she developed a growth at her neck which gradually increased in size. Kaptuya began to experience troubling symptoms, including neck swelling, which is most visible on the right side. She currently experiences shortness of breath, especially at night, and she sleeps with difficulty. She also has a fast heart rate, and easily gets tired, which affects her daily duties. She was diagnosed with non-toxic goiter, or an irregular growth of the thyroid. She needs surgery to prevent her symptoms from getting worse. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Kaptuya receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a thyroidectomy on November 22nd. Surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. This procedure will cost $936, and she and her family need help raising money. Kaptuya says, “I am the only hope for my dear children. I live because of them, and my well-being keeps them going. I would like to get well so that I may continue working in order to support them to pursue their dreams. Please assist me.”

46% funded

46%funded
$433raised
$503to go