Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Success! Malia from Kenya raised $852 to fund a fracture repair surgery.

Malia
100%
  • $852 raised, $0 to go
$852
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Malia's treatment was fully funded on December 30, 2022.

Photo of Malia post-operation

January 11, 2023

Malia underwent a fracture repair surgery.

Malias’ surgery started and ended with success. She was then discharged home on a long arm posterior splint and an arm sling that supported her hand. She was very joyful and while in the ward she was interacting nicely with other children. She will be able to use her arm and resume her normal life.

“Malia is a playful kid. When she gets well, she will be able to play and live normally just like before,” said Malias’ grandmother.

Malias’ surgery started and ended with success. She was then discharged home on a long arm posterior splint and an arm sling that supported ...

Read more
October 4, 2022

Malia is a happy and beautiful two year old girl, living in the semi-arid region of Elgeyo Marakwet County in Kenya. Because her mother is still a college student, Malia lives with her grandmother, who runs a small business at a nearby shopping center.

Recently, Malia fell and injured her right arm, while playing with other children at her home. Her grandmother brought her to a local clinic, where Malia’s arm was bandaged. Malia was then referred to the hospital, because of the pain and swelling in her arm near the elbow.

After Malia’s arm was X-rayed, doctors discovered that she had sustained a fracture of her humerus bone, and she was sent for further evaluation at the Orthopedic Department of the hospital. The surgeons determined that due to the position of the fracture, and the fact that Malia’s bones are still developing, surgery would be necessary to ensure that the bone in her arm grows properly. A long posterior splint was applied, which will stabilize Malia’s arm until her surgery.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, has stepped up to help. As Malia’s grandmother can only raise a portion of the funds needed for Malia’s surgery - which is scheduled to take place on October 4th at AIC Kapsowar Hospital - she is seeking your support to cover the remaining $852 needed for Malia’s procedure.

Malia’s grandmother says: ”I really feel bad when Malia is not happy. She has been keeping me good company, and my prayer is that she gets well and will be able to use her hand well in the future, especially when she goes to school.”

Malia is a happy and beautiful two year old girl, living in the semi-arid region of Elgeyo Marakwet County in Kenya. Because her mother is s...

Read more

Malia's Timeline

  • October 4, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Malia was submitted by Ruth Kanyeria, SAFE Program Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • October 4, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Malia received treatment at AIC Kapsowar Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 9, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Malia's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 30, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Malia's treatment was fully funded.

  • January 11, 2023
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Malia's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 5 donors

Funded by 5 donors

Treatment
Kirschner wires (K-Wire)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $852 for Malia's treatment
Hospital Fees
$367
Medical Staff
$3
Medication
$72
Supplies
$338
Labs
$24
Radiology
$7
Other
$41
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The common symptoms include extreme pain; inability/difficulty in using body parts. This procedure corrects a severe, poorly aligned fracture where the ends of affected bones are far apart. Such a fracture may occur anywhere in the body (leg, hip, arm, jaw, etc.), usually as a result of trauma.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

A non-union leads to chronic disability, pain, and inability to work. K-wire is mainly used on children.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Kapsowar Hospital serves a remote population where some people do not have money to pay for surgery. For this reason, the hospital has been incurring these costs without compensation.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is reviewed by the surgeon and a K-wire surgery is recommended. The patient meets the SAFE rep who profiles him/her. The patient is given an admission date and on that day, several tests are done in preparation for surgery. After surgery, the patient is admitted for 3 more days where the surgeon rounds on them to gauge recovery. If the patient is progressing well, they are discharged but with a date to return for a treatment review. In total, the patient will have spent 3-4 days in the hospital.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Curative. Kirschner wires (K-wires) are stiff, straight wires that are sometimes needed to repair a fracture (broken bone). K-wires are also commonly called ‘pins’. If your child has a fracture that requires surgery, they may need K-wires to help hold the bones in place until they heal. They are most commonly used for supracondylar (elbow) or wrist injuries. Depending on the location and severity of the fracture, sometimes multiple K-wires are needed. K-wires are only needed temporarily – once the bones have healed, the K-wires are removed during an outpatient appointment.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

The medium surgical risk but most trauma patients are young and tolerate the procedure well. Overall, the risk of surgery is less than the risks of the alternative (traction) or doing nothing. There is a risk of the metal becoming infected, which would require antibiotics and perhaps the removal of the hardware and second surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality orthopaedic centres in developing countries. Any American would go to their local hospital and get this procedure. Often patients have received initial care for a fracture at another hospital. Most patients seen in Kapsowar who are in need of a K-wire are mainly patients who have been not been helped in other hospitals. Usually, those hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat them.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Unfortunately the alternative is to not treat the fracture which is common and can lead to continued pain, limited use, and disfigurement.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.