J

Jeremy Roth

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

Jeremy's Story

Jeremy joined Watsi on September 9th, 2014. Six years ago, Jeremy became the 305th member to automatically support a new Watsi patient every month. Since then, 6,167 more people have become monthly donors! Jeremy's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Simon, a newborn baby from Tanzania, to fund hydrocephalus treatment.

Impact

Jeremy has funded healthcare for 88 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by Jeremy

Simon

Simon is a 3-month old baby boy from Tanzania and the only child to his parents. He was born healthy but when he was two months old he started having fevers and vomiting. His parents tried to seek treatment for him but the medication he was using only helped reduce the fevers. Soon his parents noticed his head was increasing in size and his general health became very poor due to the regular vomiting. His parents depend on small-scale farming for a living and their income is not always enough to get them by. Due to financial challenges, Simon's parents could not afford to take him to a referral hospital in time, hence his condition worsened. Through ALMC Hospital's outreach program, they learned about Simon's condition and the need for him to get treatment. Simon has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus which is putting him in danger of brain damage due to the pressure building up in his head, causing him not to be able to feed well and regular fevers. His parents cannot afford the treatment cost and are asking for help. Simon has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Simon has been experiencing increasing head circumference, fevers and vomiting. Without treatment, Simon will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Simon that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 7th and will drain the excess fluid from Simon's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Simon will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Simon’s mother says, “My son’s head keeps increasing in size and his general health deteriorates as days go by, we are unable to afford the treatment cost. Please help us.”

77% funded

77%funded
$1,004raised
$296to go
Veronicah

Veronicah is a calm baby. She was diagnosed with anal-rectal malformation a condition where she lacked an anal opening at birth. Veronicah was born normally with a normal birth weight of 2.8 kgs and discharged on the same day. After two days, her mother noticed that her abdomen was swollen and she had difficulties breathing and could barely feed. They later realized that Veronicah lacked an anal opening and passed stool through her vagina. Her parents rushed her to the nearest hospital. It’s from here that their journey in search of a specialist began. Veronicah’s parents have been to two hospitals before they could find a specialist. A colostomy was created 10th June 2019 and supported through the national health insurance system. Veronicah has been attending weekly clinics and is now ready for the second surgery which is to create an anal opening. Unfortunately, having exhausted most of his hard-earned money, Veronicah’s father, the sole breadwinner could not keep up with National Health Insurance premiums and thus had no means to pay for the needed surgical care. The family turned to their local radio station to seek help and a well-wisher advised they visit Watsi Partner BethanyKids Hospital where they could access financial and surgical assistance. If not treated, Veronicah is at a risk of acquiring infection, scaring at the colostomy site due to occasional leakages. Veronicah is the last born of three children. The firstborn who is five years old just joined school. Her father is a subsistence farmer without an external source of income. Veronicah’s mother is a stay-at-home mom. They are not in a position to raise the needed funds and thus appealing for help. “I am willing to clean the hospital as long as you want just to pay for my daughter’s surgical care. I am very desperate,” says Veronicah’s father.

100% funded

$708raised
Fully funded
Zin

Zin is a 37-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her husband, son and two daughters in Myawaddy, Karen State. Her 17-year-old son and 13-year-old daughter go to school while her youngest daughter stays home as she is still very young. To make a living, Zin used to make different Burmese snacks and sell them at the nearby villages. But she recently stopped working due to her health condition. Sometimes, her husband works as a day labourer but Zin said she does not know how much he earns from that. Six months ago, Zin started to experience stomach-ache so she went to a clinic. The doctor there did not do any investigations, instead, just prescribed her oral medication. Although Zin felt better with the medications she received at the clinic, her symptom returned after two months and she went back to see the same doctor. The doctor again prescribed her medications, but they only relieved her symptoms for a short time. In early September, Zin felt like her stomach-ache has worsened. She had it more often and the medications that she received at the clinic did not help her anymore. On 12 September 2019, Zin had a severe stomach-ache and for the last time, she returned to see the same doctor. On this visit, the doctor performed an ultrasound and said that there are stones in her common bile duct (CBD), a duct that carries bile from the gallbladder and liver into the duodenum (upper part of the small intestine). Zin has been advised to undergo a biliary obstruction repair, a procedure to repair the blockage of the bile ducts, which carry bile from the liver to the gallbladder. If left untreated, Zin's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. After seeking treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Zin is scheduled to undergo her biliary obstruction repair on October 03. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Zin's procedure and care. Zin said, “I cannot do anything now. I want to get well soon and start working again. If not, my family will not have enough food”.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded