Mehmet's Story

Mehmet joined Watsi on June 27th, 2014. Eight years ago, Mehmet joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Mehmet's most recent donation traveled 5,600 miles to support Phyu, a 44-year-old mother and seamstress from Thailand, to fund a hysterectomy.

Impact

Mehmet has funded healthcare for 124 patients in 12 countries.

Patients funded by Mehmet

Jack Zing is a 40-year-old woman who lives with her friend in a refugee camp in Tak Province and works as a midwife at the clinic in the camp run by the International Rescue Committee (IRC). She earns a monthly income of 3,222 baht (approx. $107 USD). She additionally receives 310 baht (approx. $10 USD) per month on a cash card from the organization The Border Consortium in the camp. This income is just enough to cover their daily expenses, but not enough for savings. The camp provides free health care through the IRC, but not for the care that she needs. Since 2020, Jack Zing has been experiencing lower abdominal pain, slight bleeding, unexplained fatigue and dizziness. She was diagnosed with adenomyoma with bilateral endometriotic cysts, and was advised to undergo a total abdominal hysterectomy, the surgical removal of her uterus and cervix. If left untreated, Jack Zing's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. Fortunately, Jack Zing is scheduled to undergo her hysterectomy on June 4th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,104 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, this treatment will help relieve her symptoms, including the pain and bleeding. Jack Zing says, “I felt very sad and worried when I learnt that I needed surgery, because I couldn’t afford to pay for the treatment. When I learnt that Burma Children's Medical Fund (BCMF) and donors will support the cost of my surgery treatment, I was very happy. I would like to thank all the donors and BCMF. When I recover fully, I will continue working as a midwife at IRC and also pursue my interest in sewing."

$516raised
$588to go

Fatma is a 14-year-old girl from Kenya. She is the 4th born in a family of seven children, and is in grade 7 at Sowene Primary School. She is passionate about education and likes reading, her favorite subject being English. She aspires to become a designer in the future. Fatma has clubfoot on her right foot. They discovered the condition in 2017, and she was operated on at Mombasa Hospital, but the deformity has recurred, thus affecting her mobility. We met her at the AIC Cure clinic accompanied by her mother, Asli, who explained how they had visited different hospitals to seek medical attention for her foot, including undergoing surgery at Mombasa, but the condition hasn’t been corrected; instead, it continues to worsen/bend on the right side. Both parents operate a small shop in Taveta town, which provides the family with a small income. Fatma says that she feels pain while walking and is not able to play with her friends while at school. She is scheduled to undergo surgery to correct her clubfoot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and wearing shoes. Fortunately, Fatma visited our medical partner's care center, AIC Cure International Hospital. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on October 11. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, requests $1,286 to fund Fatma's surgery. After treatment, she will be able to walk without difficulty and continue with her studies uninterrupted. “I will be happy to see my foot corrected and appreciate your assistance,” Fatma said.

$1,286raised
Fully funded

Janet is an 18-year-old student and the second of three children in her family. Her parents do not have regular employment but do work whenever they can get it at a neighboring flower farm. Janet was doing well in her early years, but in 2020, she began falling, and started experiencing headaches, with symptoms similar to epilepsy. Sometimes her eyes were affected, causing blurred vision. She began falling more frequently, and she was admitted to Kenyatta National Hospital, where a brain tumor was diagnosed. Janet had a successful craniotomy (brain surgery). Following the surgery, she developed a limping gait, had difficulty talking, and experienced non-typical body movements. Over time, she seems to have improved as she continues with therapy. Janet started experiencing new symptoms just a few weeks ago. She began crying at night but could not explain her problem. Eventually, it was determined that her left hand was not straightening out and it was suspected that Janet may have fallen and broken her hand without knowing it. An x-ray showed a closed fracture dislocation of the left elbow. Janet's mother was advised to bring her to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), and their care center. The surgeon has recommended an Open Reduction Internal Fixation (ORIF). This surgery will hopefully mend Janet's elbow. If not treated, Janet will continue to have pain. She may not be able to use her hand, and the fracture may develop malunion, or a permanent deformed healing. Fortunately, surgeons at AMH can help. On September 5th, Janet will undergo surgery. AMH is requesting $1,049 to fund this fracture repair procedure. Unfortunately, the family is not in a position to meet this cost. “My daughter does not even understand what is going on because of her other condition, but I plead for her support so that she can be able to use her hand in the future,” said Janet’s mother.

$1,049raised
Fully funded

Shashi is a 15-year-old student and the second-born child in a family of five children. His parents are farmers who depend on small-scale agriculture for sustenance and to generate some income to cover their daily expenses. Shashi was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus, a condition characterized by bilateral knocking of the knees that is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones. He first experienced this condition when he was 5 years old. Despite trying various traditional treatment methods, they were all unsuccessful. Due to the fear of being unable to afford the medical expenses, they did not initially seek help from a hospital. As a result, as Shashi grew older, his condition continued to deteriorate. What initially began as a slight bowing of his legs progressively worsened over time, causing immense concern for his parents. It became increasingly challenging for him to walk and engage in activities that required long distances of walking. He was forced to stop attending school because of its distance from home and the lack of transportation options available in his area. His condition has made it difficult for him to connect with his peers. Fortunately, our medical partner African Mission Healthcare (AMH) can help. Shashi is scheduled for corrective surgery on August 1st, and AMH is requesting $880 to fund the procedure. Treatment will hopefully restore Shashi's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Shashi says, “It is painful living like this. My legs hurt when I walk. I can’t play and socialize with my friends. I hope the treatment I get will make my life better.”

$880raised
Fully funded